How Wellness Programs Must Evolve

Last month a diverse group of experts gathered in New York for a roundtable discussion on “redefining workplace wellness.” The group spanned academia, the health professions and corporate America and while their conclusions weren’t necessarily groundbreaking, they were nonetheless insightful and thought-provoking. The Global Wellness Institute organized the meeting and they’ve just released a report summarizing the discussion — I’ve included some of the highlights below:

1. It’s Time to Get Past “Unscientific Mud-Slinging on ROI.”

The argument over return-on-investment is one of the great bugaboos bedeviling wellness. But the roundtable participants agreed that in the future companies will shift their focus on ROI to a “wider ‘return on value': not just lower healthcare costs, but important gains in retention and productivity.” “Critics are misusing this ‘ROI science’ to castigate critical, fledgling workplace health efforts,” said participant Dr. Kenneth R. Pelletier, clinical professor of medicine at UC-San Francisco and the University of Arizona. “These critics are also imposing a ‘standard of evidence’ that doesn’t exist for any other workplace investment — like a software upgrade. Successful companies — Google is a shining example — have moved well beyond ROI, to embrace total value on investment, and workplaces where a culture of health is the norm.”

2. Take Seriously That Technology-Enabling 24/7 Work Is “Killing Us.”

Those midnight calls to discuss project updates with the team in Dubai or Singapore? No good, conclude the experts: “Technology has suddenly spawned new, global work realities: imprisonment by screens, and a powerful erosion of the line between now always-on ‘work’ and ‘life.'”

James Brewer, workplace consultant at Steelcase, said large companies could learn a thing or two from their much-smaller counterparts: “Start-ups appear to be more proactive in implementing policies that help their employees define when it is OK to ‘turn it off’ and disconnect … these types of policies are largely absent in larger companies.”

Paul Terry, president and CEO of Staywell, said so-called “resilience” and “high-performance cultures” may just be colloquialisms for “high endurance cultures.” In the future, the experts agreed, tackling this 24/7 version of work will become a focus of wellness programs, possibly including a redefinition of “productivity.”

3. Embrace the Tech

Innovations like telemedicine let workers connect with doctors in ways that don’t involve a disruption to their work schedules, the experts noted. And wearables may look very different in the future, according to Dr. Pelletier: “invisible, ingestible nanotechnology, wireless Bluetooth, and the next generations of the Apple Watch will capture a broad spectrum of employees’ biometric data effortlessly and around the clock.”

4. Don’t Forget the Remote Workers

Employees working remotely may suffer more loneliness and a lack of peer support in their work and their health, the experts note. Smart wellness programs will shift from “workplace programs” to “total workforce solutions.”

“Sustaining a culture of health across the increasingly remote workforce will be utterly key in the future,” said Dr. Fikry Isaac, chief medical officer at Johnson & Johnson. “And in order to impact these remote and at-home workers, smart companies will touch on, and include, the family, significant others and the communities where they live.”

5. Mental Health Must Be a Greater Priority

Most global wellness programs have focused on physical health, the experts noted. However, the rampant “do more with less” approach to work along with the aforementioned 24/7 nature of many jobs means “we have a once-silent, but now getting louder mental health, stress and ‘burnout’ epidemic on our hands.”

“More stressful jobs and lives mean emotional well-being is taking a toll from East to West. Twenty percent of the U.S. population (at any given time) has a diagnosable mental health issue, and the research on the state of employee mental health/stress in places like Asia is sobering.”

This has led to more addictions — sleeping and anti-anxiety pill use keeps climbing, the experts noted.

There’s hope on the horizon, they also noted: research around neuroplasticity, and studies on the effectiveness of approaches like positive psychology, meditation and mindfulness is “exciting,” and the near future will bring more innovative strategies for addressing mental health and stress, and “not just for Silicon Valley and Wall Street executives.”

There’s plenty more in the report, and it’s a worthwhile read.

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A Coalition to Put Youth to Work

According to recent Pew Research Center statistics, more than one quarter of America’s nearly 8 million unemployed individuals are between the ages of 16 and 24.

Tomorrow, more than two dozen big-name U.S.-based employers will be in Chicago to launch an initiative that has designs on helping thousands of these out-of-school and out-of-work young adults find jobs.

The Opportunity Fair & Forum—starting at 8 a.m. at McCormick Place Convention Center and featuring a performance by hip-hop artist, actor and Chicago native Common—will kick off the 100,000 Opportunities program, a Starbucks-led alliance that seeks to “jump start the future” of young Americans who are neither in school nor employed, according to USA Today.

In addition to the Seattle-based specialty coffee retailer, nearly 30 other companies—including Chipotle Mexican Grill, CVS Health, Microsoft and Target—are expected to be on hand at the day-long resource and job fair. They will be joined by more than 3,000 young Chicagoans and their families for a variety of interactive experiences as well as workshops, college counseling, skill-development activities and other events.

Employers participating in tomorrow’s forum are expected to make hundreds of on-the-spot job offers to attendees, which would be quite an auspicious start for the month-old endeavor.

Spearheaded by Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz—who earlier this year pledged to hire 10,000 young, low-income individuals to work at Starbucks by the end of 2018—the coalition currently counts 29 companies as members. That number includes a dozen organizations—FedEx, Hyatt, Nordstrom, Pizza Hut and T-Mobile, for example—that just signed on last week.

Faced with a recovering labor market and a subsequently smaller pool of job candidates, these employers certainly have good, practical reasons to get on board.

The aforementioned USA Today piece points out as much.

“As the unemployment rate has dipped, the pool of workers available for entry-level jobs has shrunk,” the paper notes. “And for many companies that want to expand their footprint in urban markets, engaging disconnected youth, who are disproportionately African-American and Latino, makes business sense.”

True enough. But making business sense isn’t the only reason why 100,000 Opportunities came to be, says Sheri Schultz, wife of the Starbucks CEO and co-founder of the Schultz Family Foundation, which describes itself as “a launchpad for young adults in transition.”

“We know that this is a complex issue, and we need all of our collective horsepower to solve it,” Schultz told USA Today. “For too long, it’s been the non-profit and public sectors tackling this issue, without meaningful involvement from the private sector.”

The program certainly has ambitious goals. And even if 100,000 Opportunities doesn’t hit its target of creating 100,000 jobs for unemployed youth by the end of 2018, it’s hard to envision a scenario in which the participating companies—and scores of young job seekers—don’t benefit from its existence.

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Employers and Contraceptive Coverage

In case you missed it, a federal court of appeals ruled last Friday that religiously affiliated nonprofit employers can’t block their employees’ health care coverage for contraceptives.

The ruling in Catholic Health Care System v. Burwell finds that the plaintiffs, which include Catholic health care systems and Catholic high schools, are not burdened by having to formally object to covering contraceptives for employees.

The American Civil Liberties Union  supported the government’s arguments by participating in a friend-of-the-court brief.

The decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit held that the religious accommodation in the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive rule imposed no substantial burden on the plaintiffs’ religious freedom.

The plaintiffs challenged a requirement that employers that object to including contraceptive coverage in their employee’s insurance plans notify their insurers or the government of their objection.  The insurer must then arrange and pay for the contraceptive coverage separately.

“Today’s victory is not only incredibly important for the more than 12,000 employees who stand to gain contraception coverage, but it also sends a clear message that an employer’s religious beliefs can’t be used to deny health care benefits to employees,” said Brigitte Amiri, senior staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union’s Reproductive Freedom Project. “We fight hard to protect religious freedom at the ACLU, but that right doesn’t allow employers to discriminate against their female employees.”

With Friday’s decision, the Second Circuit joins six other circuits that have found that the accommodation poses no substantial burden on the nonprofits’ religion, including the D.C., Third, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, and Tenth Circuits.  No circuit court has ruled the other way.

Viewed purely from an HR perspective, the ruling seems to be yet another small — but welcome — step toward full equality in the workplace.

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On HR Leaders and the Strength of Love

dv1080014I am feeling very compelled to share this with you at this time. I had seen this post on the HRExaminer site a while back, but what I’ve just been through personally has been bringing it front-of-mind in a very big way.

The piece, by Jason Seiden, co-founder and CEO of Brand Amper, addresses love. Specifically, as his title makes plain, “Love: Why Tomorrow’s Leaders Will Come from HR.”

If I had to interpret his overriding theme, I guess it would be that the people he knows in HR are better at real friendships and real relationships than people in any other profession he knows. And it’s because of that ability on the part of HR professionals to really connect with fellow humans who are doing, or going through, human things that the future of business rests — in his estimation — in their hands.

“They’re the best group of people you could want to be surrounded by,” he writes. “They get it: Success in business doesn’t come from technology. It may come through tech, but it comes from relationships.” He goes on:

“If you want to see the future of business leadership, look at the nexus of social HR and recruiting. I know HR gets (and often deserves) a bad rap, but the smaller circle of social HR leaders — the ones who share aspects of their lives with each other online, get together at conferences, and support one another’s businesses — have what [one] former friend and others actually crave: genuine connection.

“This HR group understands that sending a ‘happy birthday’ note on Facebook isn’t about pretending to be friends; it’s about knowing what it feels like to open your phone to 100+ birthday messages and wanting to be small part of that avalanche of love for someone else.”

We may not be HR professionals here at HRE; we may only write about your profession. But I can at least tell you Seiden’s onto something about the heart of business running on authentic relationships, not the manufactured or rhetorical ones.

The day I left on a recent extended leave to see my father through his final life journey after he bravely chose to cease all cancer treatment because it had failed, I received the kind of love Seiden describes. I did my best to leave my HRE house in order, knowing how my forethought would help my friends.

The love and support, and hugs, I received here as I set out on that heart-wrenching journey — to my father’s journey — spoke volumes to me about the power of friendship and relationships to lay enduring foundations in any environment where people work together toward a common goal.

Likewise, the kindness, patience and understanding I’ve received since my return one week ago today solidifies this sense of power that human connection has in the workplace.

People are, indeed, our most valued resources — an idea that’s still catching on here in corporate America, but seems to be taking hold in the United Kingdom, according to this intriguing piece posted on HREOnline today by our talent-management columnist, Wharton professor Peter Cappelli.

And this value isn’t just reflected in higher wages or paid leave, as the U.K. initiatives Cappelli talks about seem focused on. It’s reflected — at least I think it is — in workplace cultures, and in the courage of managers and HR leaders to show some heart on their pathways to becoming better business partners and leaders.

If any of you in HR are waiting for permission to lead with the love Seiden says is your strong suit, you certainly have mine.

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A Cup of Reality for Starbucks?

In the world of coffee retailing, there’s little question Starbucks has been an innovator, experimenting (often successfully) with new product offerings and fine-tuning the customer experience on a regular basis. But it’s also no secret that Starbucks hasn’t limited its innovation to just these areas. It’s also been a pioneer where employee practices are concerned, launching cutting-edge initiatives in areas such as health benefits, tuition support and career development.

Starbucks_West_CoastBecause of these programs and others, Starbucks leaves many of its competitors in the dust when it comes to Glassdoor ratings, earning 3.8 stars out of 5 and supposedly beating the industry average by a wide margin. In comparison, Dunkin Donuts earned 2.8 and Peet’s Coffee earned 3.2 on Glassdoor.

But if we’re to believe a recent analysis conducted by San Francisco-based Monitor 360 that takes a closer look at the Starbucks narratives smattered throughout the Glassdoor reviews, the Seattle-headquartered employers isn’t without some noticeable blemishes.

Monitor 360, a former unit of Monitor Group that was spun off a few years back, recently applied its Narrative Analytics methodology to Starbucks’ Glassdoor reviews in order to identify sentiments and themes contained in the comments. (Earlier this week, Kevin Rockmael, chief marketing officer at Monitor 360, shared a report detailing the findings with me.) As you might expect, the report contained a lot of positive feelings. But it also revealed some definite “needs improvement” areas.

On the positive side, the report found that more than 60 percent of employee comments expressed confidence in Starbucks’ senior leadership and company vision. “The three narratives that comprised this coverage—’Starbucks the Star,’ ‘Grueling with a Shot of Great,’ and ‘ “Ground” by Middle Management’—focused more on employees’ pride in Starbucks’ vision and values than on benefits,” the report said, “suggesting that consistently delivering an inspiring narrative about the value of employees to the company can motivate as much as offering free lattes.”

Additionally, the first two narratives suggest that Starbucks can be an exciting place to build a career.

As for the negative, narratives such as “Part Time Pariah” and “Baristas are the Backbone” emerged that bemoan the difficulties of building a career at Starbucks — revealing one critical driver of employee turnover. The report points out that these were less prominent than the positive narratives about the company’s vision and values, but still comprised a disturbing 31 percent of total employee comments.

Meanwhile, the report continued, “The ‘Ground’ by Middle Management” narrative suggests that “many employees who have a positive view of Starbucks as a corporation simultaneously hold major concerns about middle management. Many view middle managers as out of touch — visiting stores infrequently and promoting those who are undeserving. This suggests that leadership’s efforts to brand Starbucks as a place for opportunity resonate deeply with employees on an emotional level, but that same vision is not regularly communicated by local company leadership, nor does the inspiring vision always match the day-to-day reality.”

A fourth narrative, something the report’s authors labeled “Glorified Fast Food,” suggests some internal and external brand-facing challenges. As far as the internal implications are concerned, the report contends that this narrative reflects employees’ beliefs that “Starbucks is losing its identity as a specialty brewer, suggesting that replacing the art of brewing with increased mechanization can damage retention.”

I asked Rockmael for his thoughts on the report’s biggest surprises. He said the narratives having to do with middle management and glorified fast food were at the top of his list. In the case of the latter, he added, the analysis suggests that employees and former employees are connecting Starbucks more to the likes of McDonald’s and Burger King than management would like.

Rockmael told me this is the first time Monitor 360 has used Glassdoor to uncover these types of narratives, but it may not be the last. (Glassdoor, he said, gave his firm permission to conduct this analysis.)

He also noted that Monitor 360 hasn’t shared the findings directly with Starbucks, at least not yet. But were it to do so, I’d have to think Starbucks might consider some of the more bitter ones worthy of further reflection.

 

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The Paradox of Unlimited Paid Leave

Paid leave is in the news lots these days: President Obama has just drafted an executive order requiring federal contractors to provide paid leave for medical or health reasons or to care for a sick relative. Employers who fall under the order’s purview would be expected to provide a minimum of about seven days of paid leave per year and to allow the leave to accrue year after year. The executive order — which is expected to go into effect within a couple of months – would not only affect hundreds of thousands of employees, but may have an effect that extends beyond federal contractors: “You can build an expectation that paid sick leave comes with a job,” Elise Gould, a senior economist at the Economic Policy Institute, told the New York Times. “Changes in cultural norms matter.”

rbrs_0240Over in Silicon Valley, meanwhile, the cultural norm is plush benefits for the employees of the area’s tech behemoths – and now Netflix has raised the bar: Earlier this week it announced it would offer unlimited paid maternity and paternity leave. Employees can stay out as long as they like to care for their newborn or newly adopted children while still receiving full pay and benefits, said Netflix Chief Talent Officer Tawni Cranz.

Netflix’s announcement makes the generous leave policies offered by Facebook, Google, Accenture and Johnson & Johnson – which offer paid leave for up to four or five months – pale in comparison. However, the longstanding question about unlimited time-off policies – whether they’re for vacation, health reasons or the birth or adoption of a child – is that if you leave it to the discretion of employees as to how much time to take, won’t they actually end up taking less time (or none at all) than if they were given a set amount?

“An unlimited policy sounds great in theory,” writes Jena McGregor, the On Leadership columnist for the Washington Post. “Unless the culture really supports it, however, employees won’t know how to react and may even end up taking off less time than they otherwise would.”

When tech firm Evernote began offering unlimited vacation time to its employees back in 2011, it noticed some employees were actually taking less vacation in order to look better to their bosses, writes MarketWatch’s Catey Hill. The company then actually began paying people $1,000 to actually take a vacation, she writes.

The culprit may be “work martyr syndrome,” Hill writes: Employees – especially those in highly competitive workplaces – are looking for any advantage they can, and by deciding to take less (or even no) time off, they believe they’re looking better in the eyes of their bosses. “You’re trying to show you’re a harder worker,” executive coach Marc Dorio told Hill.

In other words, unless Netflix and other companies offering unlimited time off actually build support for extensive parental or medical leave time into their culture (with leaders setting the example), it will probably be a perk in name only.

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Companies Surveyed Flunk Employee Engagement

When it comes to employee engagement, what maturity level is your company?

Last week, the Temkin Group – a customer experience research, consulting and training firm in Waban, Mass. – released the results of its third Employee Engagement Competency & Maturity (EECM) study, which analyzed the employee engagement efforts of 206 companies that support at least 1,000 employees. Companies were placed into one of six stages of employee engagement maturity. Only 19 percent ended up in the top two stages of maturity while 56 percent fell into the bottom two stages.

The firm assessed each company’s maturity level across five competencies, referred to as the five I’s of employee engagement: inform, inspire, instruct, involve and incent.

The results are not exactly encouraging:

Maturity stage 1: Damaging (19 percent of companies fell into this category)

Maturity stage 2: Neglecting (37 percent)

Maturity stage 3: Maintaining (25 percent)

Maturity stage 4: Enhancing (16 percent)

Maturity stage 5: Maximizing (3 percent)

On the upside, the overall ratings have increased from previous years and the percentage of companies in the lower two stages declined from 67 percent last year to 56 percent this year. Still, not all stages reflected improvement, possibly suggesting that employee engagement at some organizations may be headed in the wrong direction.

Consider that the percentage at the top two stages remained idle over the last two years and competency levels dropped between 2014 and 2015. Likewise, while 69 percent of companies measured employee engagement at least once a year, executives at only 45 percent of the companies consider taking action on the results as a high priority.

Frankly, that last statistic is baffling. Over the years, numerous studies have repeatedly proven employee engagement’s huge impact on almost every facet of a business – productivity, customer service, attraction and retention . . . the list goes on and on.

These results are no different. Seventy-two percent of more mature companies reported above average customer experiences compared to 48 percent of other companies. Seventy-five percent also improved their financial performance over the previous year compared to 50 percent of those with weaker scores. Yet, only 35 percent of respondents classified employee engagement activities as well-coordinated across their company.

“HR should be leading the charge to raise the firm’s employee engagement maturity level,” says Bruce Temkin, customer experience transformist and managing partner at the Temkin Group. “Employee engagement is one of the most strategic opportunities for HR professionals.”

Meanwhile, survey participants point to three common obstacles that prevent them from turning this situation around: the lack of a clear employee engagement strategy, inconsistent buy-in from middle managers, and limited funding along with inconsistent buy-in across the leadership team.

Still, there’s plenty HR can do. According to Temkin, HR can benchmark their maturity against other companies to see where they stand, discuss the impact of their scores with colleagues across departments, identify weak spots and develop specific improvement plans.

The worst thing HR can do is stay stuck in neutral. But considering that employee engagement offers such a huge strategic opportunity for building company success, is that really an option?

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The Steep Price of Sleep Deprivation

The conversation around nap rooms in the workplace isn’t exactly a new one.

(For example, you can see just a few of HRE’s contributions to the long-running discussion here, here and, most recently, here.)

The consensus seems to be that nooks around the office where employees can retreat for some (probably much-needed) shuteye will likely remain a dream for many workers. But the effect that sleep deprivation has on the workforce—and on the countless employees who seem to perpetually run on too little rest—is very real.

The Washington Post’s Jena McGregor examined this impact in a recent piece.

For instance, McGregor cited Harvard data demonstrating that, for the average worker, insomnia results in the loss of more than 11 days of productivity each year, equaling $2,280. Add that up across the United States, and the figure comes to $63.2 billion.

Researchers have also found “clear links between poor sleep and reduced quality of life on the job,” wrote McGregor, noting studies that have revealed links between insomniac supervisors and abusive behavior as well as correlations between lack of sleep and medical conditions such as dementia and diabetes.

Employers are noticing these connections as well, and some have taken steps to aid employees in sleeping more and sleeping better, and in turn becoming physically healthier, mentally sharper, and, of course, more productive.

Vendors are helping as well. As McGregor points out, Ceridian has begun to include sleep coaches as part of the wellness packages it offers clients, while sleep diagnostic and treatment company SleepMed has introduced a nationwide health and wellness product that screens employees for sleep disorders and provides access to therapies.

Big Health’s Sleepio at Work program is the latest addition to this market space. Big Health launched the digital sleep improvement program last week, not quite one year after releasing its Sleepio app, which imports sleep data from fitness tracking devices to give users an overview of their sleep profiles, and provides a personalized program of cognitive behavioral therapy techniques. The digital provider of personalized behavioral medicine includes organizations such as LinkedIn and Henry Ford Health System on its client roster, and has helped lead employee workshops on sleep at Google, according to the Post.

Ultimately, however, it’s going to take more than technology and workshops to change the “sleep is for losers” mentality that remains prevalent in many organizations, according to Russell Sanna, a former executive director of the division of sleep medicine at Harvard Medical School.

This mind-set must go, and employers should be helping to see it out the door, he says.

“’Some companies don’t want to be known as sleep-friendly,” Sanna told the Post. “They want to be known as lean and mean.”

Thus far, the conversation about sleep deprivation has been “dominated by sleep scientists and self-help gurus,” he continued. “It needs desperately to have people in the organizational change, workplace advocacy and legal [fields] to help reframe the agenda.”

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‘Everyone, Everywhere, Everyday’

In case you missed this late last week, Forbes contributor Kevin Kruse had a great post detailing the all-encompassing employee-engagement efforts at Discover, the Riverwoods, Ill.-based financial-services company.

According to Kruse’s piece, employee engagement has long been a priority at Discover, which tied for highest in customer satisfaction with credit-card companies in 2014 by J.D. Power.  With approximately 9,000 employees working across multiple U.S. call and operational centers, and almost 14,000 total employees working globally, “the company knows that engagement is a critical driver of customer service, retention and hard business results.”

The backbone of any engagement process is the employee survey, and 88 percent of all Discover employees took the time to complete theirs, Kruse writes, and credits the impressive completion rate to a solid communication strategy and alignment with the business units.

He goes on to quote Erin Correa, a manager of executive development and talent management at Discover, who says it takes “a lot of communication” to get such a high rate of response to the company’s engagement survey:

It definitely begins with a lot of communication in advance of the survey. We work hard to identify leaders within our business units to help us communicate the importance of the survey. It’s one thing if HR is saying employee engagement  is important, it’s another if a business unit champion is explaining the linkage between engagement and business results.

And Kruse also quotes Andrea Nunez, a Discover manager of culture and employee engagement, who says that, despite their excellent scores, they aren’t resting on their laurels. In addition to engagement, Kruse writes, Discover has added a focus on understanding what environmental factors are enabling or disabling performance, and what is increasing or decreasing well-being.

To that end, Nunez says:

Our motto around engagement is, ‘Everyone, Everywhere, Everyday.’ Our leaders and individual contributors already have a solid understanding of traditional drivers of engagement, like the need to celebrate successes and the power of recognition. But we are now explaining that people might be happy but not enabled or truly energized.  We are using the survey results as one data point to understand the obstacles and barriers that are disabling people from performing at their best.

The most recent Discover survey, Kruse writes, found that “decision making and operational effectiveness” was an area of opportunity for improvement throughout the organization, and the HR team is now working closely with various leaders across the organization to focus on timely decisions, clear roles and responsibilities and more efficient operational approaches.

Nunez says, “It’s really a change management effort far beyond traditional engagement efforts. We’re in the position of driving change, understanding the dimensions of the issue, and providing resources on an ongoing basis to help our leaders with this challenge.”

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CEO Generously Delivers to Workers

Why not end the week with a brief but upbeat story about a CEO who isn’t reluctant to share …

ThinkstockPhotos-480903116Stories appearing on CNN Money and Entrepreneur websites this week reported that Nevzat Aydin, co-founder and CEO of Yemeksepeti, a Turkish food delivery company he helped launch 15 years ago, recently decided to share a huge chunk of the proceeds generated from his company’s $589 million sale to Germany’s Delivery Hero with 114 of his employees. (The firm employs a total 370 employees.)

CNN Money reported the employees received an impressive $237 million from the sale. According to the story, “Aydin’s employees are paid between $1,000 and $2,000 a month. That means the average payout is worth roughly 150 times their monthly wage, and tops the average Wall Street bonus for 2014 by $65,000.”

Aydin told CNN Money that “Yemeksepeti’s success story did not happen overnight and many people participated in this journey with their hard work and talent. I believe in teamwork and I believe success is much more enjoyable and glorious when shared with the rest of the team.”

In deciding how to allocate the bonuses,” the Entreprenuer website reported, “Aydin factored in how long they’d worked for the company (requiring two years, minimum) along with the individual’s job performance and their ‘future potential in the company.’ ”

The story was first reported by Turkish newspaper Hurriet.

CNN Money noted that the bonus plan was decided upon prior to the sale, but that the acquirer, Delivery Hero, supported the move.

 

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