Category Archives: HR technology

Transforming the Future of Work

As expected, Ray Wang gave attendees at HR Tech’s closing session, “Transforming the Future of Work,” a lot to think about last Friday.

In his usual highly energetic way, Wang, founder and principal analyst of Constellation Research, explored how technology is altering work as we know it—and what HR and IT leaders need to do to prepare for the new business models that are emerging.

145926450Early on in his remarks, he touched on the parts mobile, social, the cloud and Big Data are playing—and are going to play—in shaping the digital landscape of tomorrow.

“Mobile is not about the device,” Wang told the packed room. “When you mobile-enable something, it means you can do it in motion … ” in 30 seconds or less.

Social, meanwhile, is not about the networks, but about creating brand-new verbs such as  “share, like and publish,” and about engaging people.

The cloud? It’s an option that allows you to say, “ ‘Hey, I don’t need to worry about technology [and] can spend more time improving the process and improving the experience.” And Big Data isn’t about information, but about the insights that can be generated and about making better decisions.

At the end of the day, Wang said, the goal is for businesses to take all of this data and create new experiences and outcomes. Today, he said, companies are in the “outcomes business” and building relationships, not selling products and services.

In turn, Wang said, this is inevitably going to impact the kinds of people they are hiring, the skill sets they need and the ways they are structured.

In the digital world, what’s the best way to hire away your competitor’s talent? he asked. “Monitor LinkedIn,” he said. “If you see 48 changes at the same company, you know something’s going down. The signals are all there.”

Wang told attendees that companies are going to need to continually look to the data to generate meaningful insights and thereby make better bias-free decisions.

In line with that, he predicted that more companies are going to be appointing chief digital officers who are dedicated to thinking about and operationalizing the organization’s digital strategy—and he suggested that all leaders are going to need to be digitally enabled.

Going forward, Wang said, HR and IT are going to have to work more closely together.

“If you’re on the HR side,” he said, “you want it simple, no manuals. You also want the ability to have it scalable [so you don’t] need to call IT to make a change. You want it sexy”—so people will want to use it.

In contrast, he said, IT wants it safe. “You don’t want to take the system out. You want to make sure that the system is not going to be insecure, [since] you don’t want to be on the front page of the Wall Street Journal. And you want to make sure it’s a sustainable platform … .”

Change, he said, isn’t going to happen in a silo.

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Recruiting Beyond Traditional Social Networks

An interesting little recruiting story came out of a late-afternoon session at the HR Technology® Conference in Las Vegas Thursday. 178915467--social mediaSlugged “How Red Hat Approaches Hiring Beyond Traditional Social Networks,” the session featured Brad Warga, senior vice president of customer and employee success for Gild Inc., a San Francisco-based technology-talent search firm, and Don Farr, director of global-talent acquisition for Red Hat, a global open-source provider.

“We found [traditional candidate sources such as] LinkedIn just weren’t providing the recruiting results we needed,” Farr told conference attendees. Long story short, he knew Warga, but not much about Gild, so decided to try him out with an assignment: Find him 200 top technology developers in a city abroad where Red Hat does business. Warga turned it around in record time “and more than half of the developers on his list were already employees of Red Hat,” said Farr.

Pretty convincing. So Farr decided to use Gild’s sourcing and reporting tool, based on far-more specific tech-developer social-media data — including code information and technical questions and answers, indicating levels of focus and expertise — to complement the recruiting system he already had in place.

Not only has it enriched Red Hat’s recruiting, with vastly improved and far enhanced returns on the right kinds of candidates for the growing company, it’s even provided some surprises.

Key among them was proof it needed to enhance its employee-referral service as well. Using Gild’s tools and services, Red Hat was able to determine that 70 percent of its developers who came in outside the referral program were actually connected in some way to current employees through social media.

“In other words,” said Farr, “we could have hired them ourselves if we had just sourced them through more social [streams]. The connections were out there.”

Long story short, Farr convinced his CEO to invest more in employee referrals and the savings are already being realized.

“We now have an employee-referral portal tracked through our applicant-tracking system,” Farr said. “We’ve effectively built a process where referrals aren’t going into a black box anymore.”

Lesson learned here? “Take advantage of the opportunity to embrace social media in multiple ways,” particularly when you’re looking for something as specific and hard to find as tech developers, he said.

“This is really the story of the old guard and the new guard,” Farr added. “You have to adapt or die.”

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HR Tech: Out With the Outmoded!

“If talent is the most important part of every business, then why do we manage it so badly?”

This question, posed near the beginning of Jason Averbook’s presentation at HR Tech 2014, titled “What the End of the ‘Job’ Means for the Future of Work and Talent Management,” was one of the major themes of his talk. Averbook, chief innovation officer at technology consulting firm Appirio and author of the new book HR: From Now to Next, repeatedly made the point that as the nature of work undergoes drastic change, the talent-management practices still used by a majority of companies today also need to be transformed, or perhaps jettisoned altogether.

“Many of the talent processes still in use today come from a time when our economy was manufacturing-based,” he said. “So today, most of our talent practices are broken down old pieces of crap — we manage people like they were machines, with annual performance reviews, timekeeping, performance ratings.”

Talent is the most important part of any business and, unlike machinery, can’t be easily replaced, said Averbook. So why, he asked, do HR departments continue to subject this precious resource to outmoded processes that no one — not even HR itself — believes actually work?

“How many of you here believe that your performance-management process actually helps improve performance?” he challenged the audience.  When only one person raised his hand, Averbook asked “So why, then, do you continue to use it?”

“For compliance,” one person replied. “Because HR makes us,” said another.

These outmoded processes include how most organizations go about measuring employee engagement, said Averbook,

“If engagement is so important, how come you’re only measuring it once or twice a year?” he said. “Do you look at your Facebook page just once a year, to see if anyone ‘liked’ your stuff? Engagement should be something you look at every day.”

Twitter can be an excellent way to determine employee engagement because it can reflect current engagement levels, rather than what they were six months ago, said Averbook. HR is a business function, not a support function, he said, and as such, its technology for supporting talent should incorporate the following five principles:

  1. It should be real time
  2. It should be looking now and forward, not backward
  3. It should be based on killing silos within the organization
  4. Its processes should be for the good of the business, not HR
  5. It should be easy.

As the nature of work and jobs continues to change, with many organizations moving toward an independent-contractor model, talent processes can no longer be cyclical and the technology supporting them can’t be user-unfriendly, said Averbook.

“You’ve heard of business-to-business — well, now we live in a business-to-employee world, and if a process isn’t simple, employes won’t do it,” he said.

And if your technology vendors can’t provide tools that are simple and intuitive and that meet your specific needs, then build your own, said Averbook.

“If your vendor can’t come through, then build an app yourself,” he said. “It’s not hard. My 10-year-old builds apps.”

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New Workforce Data Explored at HR Tech

Based on new research released Wednesday at the 17th Annual HR Technology® Conference and discussed in Thursday’s opening 174186913 (1)general session, employers and HR leaders seem to have some exciting new arsenal for recreating, reshaping and sustaining their workforces of tomorrow.

The research, to be released in quarterly reports as part of an ongoing ADP Workforce Vitality Report, measures the total real wages paid to the U.S. private-sector workforce based on a number of metrics, including job holders’ wages, job holders’ hours worked, job switchers’ wages and total employment. Although this index, at 110.6 in the third quarter of 2014, is considered the report’s baseline, it did show 0.77 percent growth from the previous quarter.

So job growth, as measured by this new combination of statistics, is, essentially, going up.

What’s especially exciting, though, seems to be the potential future indicators that so much data can provide the employment sector, when you consider it’s depth — based on the wages and employment profiles of ADP’s more than 50 million (one in six) paycheck recipients.

Segments of the U.S. workforce and the growth of wages and hours worked in any industry in any state are now tangible, or at least potentially tangible, showing where growth is strongest and weakest, and perhaps why. Segments “by age, by income, by full-time and part-time status, and even by gender” will also be available, “the latter of which is especially exciting to me,” said Ahu Yildirmaz, head of the ADP Research Institute, at the panel discussion.

Here, for more, is a recent CNBC televised discussion about the new research and another report from MarketWatch.

The session — moderated by David Gergen, senior political analyst at CNN, and including panelists John Boudreau, professor and research director at the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business; Steven Cochrane managing director at Moody’s Analytics; Steven Rice, executive vice president of HR for Juniper Networks; and Yildirmaz — took in differing perspectives on just what all this data might mean.

Although the report indicates the South is leading the Northeast in job creation, and low-wage jobs — as in trade, transportation and retail — are leading over higher-income positions, questions still loom over whether this retail boom “is driven by higher wages or higher numbers of jobs” since the data combines all factors into one vitality — or growth — index, said Boudreau.

Moreover, “HR folks today can think of [where to find, place and develop talent] like a chess game, playing it in a more nuanced way,” he said. For instance, the index looks at four types of workers in the labor market: those who stay with the same firm (job holders), those who change jobs (job switchers), those newly hired (entrants) and those who left the firm either voluntarily or involuntarily (leavers).

Where index indicators show higher numbers of “leavers” or “entrants” — be they by industry or region — or higher-level jobs unfilled, “HR folks can be asking, ‘What would it take to make [a particular] pocket of folks who aren’t ready to fill this new talent need more ready for this need as opposed to [having to] seek talent outside the organization?’ ” said Boudreau.

The dynamics of the numeric indications, said Cochrane, actually show “economic growth happening everywhere … we have moved through the downturn, albeit in  the context of a slow-growing economy … but the gap is widening between the South and West, and the Northeast and Midwest” … and this could be indicative of growth in general in the South, as in Texas oil and energy, and the “structure of the economy changing.”

Rice left attendees with an important reminder as the sole HR practitioner on the panel; that being that, while the ADP data is a start and a helpful tool, the main goal for all HR leaders using it will be to “build the best workforce to build our companies of the future.”

Looking at organizations, he said, “has completely changed for heads of HR [in terms of] where talent is located, where it’s leaving, cost of labor, etc.” It’s far more of a global challenge now.

“We need to be able to tap into that new talent pool,” said Rice. “There’s a lot of shifting, too, in terms of skill sets and teaching of skill sets to tie into that changing talent pool.”

HR leaders are also grappling with when it makes sense to bring talent together under one roof versus allowing for more virtual project work and collaboration.

“We all need to be asking, ‘What are the areas where we can drive the talent for our ideal workforce?’ ” said Rice. “This kind of data can help.”

 

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HR Tech: Rise of the Machines

When you’re a first-time passenger in a Google driverless car rolling down busy Highway 101 near San Francisco, you go through three phases, said HR Technology Conference keynote speaker Andrew McAfee: the first is “raw, abject terror,” quickly followed by phase 2 — active fascination. Twenty minutes in, that tends to be followed by the third and final phase: mild boredom.

“These cars are programmed to drive the way we were taught to in driver’s ed classes and then promptly forgot,” said McAfee, principal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and co-author of the recent bestseller The Second Machine Age. “There’s no speeding or abrupt lane changes — it feels like riding an airport monorail.”

McAfee’s driverless car adventure was the indirect result of a book  by two professor colleagues, who had written that despite the advances of computers and robotics, they would probably never overtake human beings’ ability to master and rapidly adapt to quickly changing patterns. Thus, they wrote, a computer could never do something like navigate a car through heavy traffic. The book in question, The New Division of Labor, was published in 2004. Six years later, Google announced that its engineers had been riding in computer-guided cars for a number of years.

“As soon as I heard that, I knew I had to experience it,” said McAfee.

The subject of McAfee’s talk, “Making the Right Choices in the Second Machine Age,” was that we’re now living in the greatest era of transformation since the Industrial Revolution. Driverless cars, supercomputers that handily beat long-time Jeopardy! champions and cheap, flexible robots mean that many jobs long-thought to be “automation-proof” because they could only be done by humans will likely be taken over by artificial intelligence. This will, of course, have huge implications for the workplace and for enterprises, he said.

“I don’t think all this will result in enormous factories staffed by only two employees, one of whom is a dog whose job is to bite the human if he tries to touch anything important,” said McAfee. “But I do think we need to re-examine the boundaries between technology and humans and rethink our business models.”

Ideally, human intelligence and artificial intelligence can complement each other, he said. He cited organizations that opened themselves to input from outsiders and used data algorithms to greatly improve service, accuracy and productivity. Such organizations stand in sharp contrast to those that continue to rely on “HiPPOs,” or “the highest-paid person’s opinion,” whether it be the CEO or highly paid outside consultants.

“Some HiPPOs will take data in, but it’s their gut that ultimately makes the decision,” said McAfee.

Geeks, by comparison (McAfee considers “geek” a compliment and describes them as people who are “fascinated and driven by data”) are willing to ignore their gut and follow the data to where it leads them.

This reaps notable dividends, he said: Companies that adopt “data-driven decision-making” achieve  a level of productivity that’s 5 percent to 6 percent higher than those that don’t. Digital intelligence is remaking occupations from dairy farming to pathology — indeed, a digital pathologist created by Stanford scientists has proven to be better, on average, at cancer detection than highly trained human pathologists, said McAfee.

For organizations, he said, the upshot of all this must be that they make themselves more open to data-driven approaches and to outsiders who promise to bring in different ways of thinking and doing things, rather than continuing to rely on HiPPOs. He cited the Obama 2012 campaign, which not only brought in “data geeks” to identify new ways of identifying and motivating voters but put them in charge of key operations — a sharp departure from most political campaigns, he said.

“A lot of companies will not be open to this approach, and that will lead to a lot of disruption,” he said. “But if we can find new ways to combine human and digital intelligence, then the sky’s the limit.”

 

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Giving Employees a ‘Priceless’ Experience

When it comes to interfacing with HR, MasterCard Inc. wants its employees to have a—you guessed it—“priceless” experience.

At a session yesterday titled “Deploying Technology to Support the HR Experience at MasterCard” during the 17th HR Technology Conference and Expo in Las Vegas, Lois Miller, senior vice president and group head of HR services and solutions at MasterCard, walked attendees through the company’s recent implementation of a global HR portal. (The portal was built with the help of Towers Watson.)

MasterCard_Logo_svgIn 2011, Miller said, the Purchase, N.Y.-headquartered company officially moved over to Workday from a Lawson HCM and several best-of-breed solutions. In doing so, the company sought to create a unified platform with greater efficiencies and effectiveness, including giving employees direct access to information. “We wanted to enable employees to find the answers to questions themselves” instead of having them call or email HR directly, she explained.

At the same time, Miller said, MasterCard sought to give its 10,000 employees around the globe a “consumer-grade look and feel”  in order to simply the experience for them.

In conjunction with the portal going live, Miller and her team shut down HR’s email system so employees would have no other choice but to use PeoplePlace to get the information they were seeking. If employees came up empty handed, they could seek an answer through another new tool called AskHR. (Prior to the rollout, she said, HR performed a number of usability studies to ensure that both PeoplePlace and AskHR were a positive experience.)

Miller noted that “change management” topped the list of challenges she and her team faced. Interestingly, she said, it turned out that employees and managers were more accepting of the changes than HR. (Certainly, a comment we’ve heard before.)

To address the barriers standing in the way of adoption, HR produced a comprehensive communication effort, including a video featuring MasterCard’s CHRO Ron Garrow and describing the new portal and its purpose. HR also created a competition aimed at getting employees to try out PeoplePlace, asking them to locate five words (“find human resource information faster”) buried throughout the tool.

Speaking to the success of the effort, Miller reported that adoption has been impressive and that there’s been “zero pushback.” In August of this year, she said, HR received 30 percent fewer AskHR cases than emails it received in August 2013.

As might be expected, the company is currently tracking how the tools are being used, including the kinds of information employees are consuming, and plans to use that data to make improvements.

Miller presented the session with Jonathan Sears, Towers Watson’s Americas practice leader.

 

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HR Tech Keynoter: Big Data is a People Issue

Although the buzz phrase “Big Data” can still fill the hearts of some HR professionals with dread, Rahaf Harfoush wants them to get over it — indeed, they need to get over it.  Harfoush, co-author of the recent bestseller The Decoded Company: What If We Understood Our Talent Better Than Our Customers?, delivered the first-ever “Welcome Keynote” yesterday at the 17th HR Technology Conference and Expo at the Mandalay Bay Resort in Las Vegas.

“Big data is no longer a technology issue, it’s a leadership issue,” she said.  The sheer amount of data being produced these days — particularly by individuals, thanks to the ubiquity of smartphones — means that big data will affect all industries.

“We live in a time of data abundance, and we as individuals have become data-producing powerhouses thanks to Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and the like,” said Harfoush. All of this personalized data floating around makes it much easier for companies to offer products and services tailored to individual tastes, based on personal preferences, she said.

Data abundance and the rise of personalization is coming up against a third trend, she said: A talent shortage that, according to a Manpower survey, has left one out of three companies unable to fill key roles.

Companies that make smart use of big data can become “talent magnets,” said Harfoush. She urged the attendees to consider “the Decoded Model,” which consists of using technology as a coach, using data as a sixth sense, and “engineered ecosystems.”

By using technology as a coach, companies such as Sprint have been able to track data from its 45 call centers to link shortcomings in performance to training deficiencies, and use those “teachable moments” to support its employees in providing better customer service, she said.

UPS relied on “data as a sixth sense” to analyze the routes its delivery drivers used and discovered that if it came up with routes that eliminated the need for left turns, it was able to save millions of dollars in reduced costs and improved delivery time.  Google, meanwhile, used “engineered ecosystems” to identify the eight qualities of its most-effective managers via its Project Oxygen initiative. Once those eight qualities were identified, said Harfoush, Google remade its management training and recruitment processes to take into account that the ability to be an effective coach ranked much higher than technical skills. The result, she said, was higher employee job-satisfaction rates and lower turnover.

“The best part about a ‘Decoded Company’ is that their workplaces don’t suck,” said Harfoush. “People like going to work there.”

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A Hospital Employee’s Offensive Tweets

We’ve written before about the “bring your own device to work” trend, commonly referred to as BYOD. Experts have cautioned about the potential risks employers face when allowing employees to bring devices that can be easily used to share and disseminate potentially confidential information. Now comes news of a Philadelphia-area hospital employee whose Twitter postings will no doubt cause more sleepless nights for medical-center HR and legal staffers.

Kathryn Knott, an emergency room technician at Lansdale Hospital in Lansdale, Pa., apparently liked to write about the patients and their medical conditions she encountered — and her personal opinion of their conditions — during the course of her work. Her Twitter posts include these gems (as reported by the Philadelphia Daily News):

“Babysitting a 36 yo 30pillxanax overdose and holding the urinal for him is definitely what I wanted to do today #winninglikeVegas.”
Knott’s June 10, 2013, photo of an X-ray of a busted pelvis is captioned, “why would you clean your gutters in the rain? #ouch.”
Another, on Feb. 20, 2013, shows a clear bag containing something lumpish. Its caption reads, “A patient gave me a bag of ice with his two fingers in it!” Yet another, posted on New Year’s Day 2013, shows a small spring – X-rayed in what appears to be an abdomen – captioned, “Kid had way too much fun at lacosta last night. Swallowed a pen spring. #rage.”
Knott’s Twitter postings came to light during the course of a police investigation of a brutal event involving her and a large group of friends, who were captured on video allegedly beating and verbally abusing a gay male couple in downtown Philadelphia recently. Knott, whose Twitter posts also included ones denigrating homosexuals, has been suspended from her job by Abington Health, which owns Lansdale Hospital:

 We can confirm that Kathryn Knott has been employed at Lansdale Hospital since May 2011. Because of the nature of the charges against her, she has been suspended from her job as an Emergency Room tech.”

Abington Health is also investigating her Twitter account.The tweets could violate the hospital’s patient-privacy and social-media policies, according to the statement from Abington Health

Daily News columnist Ronnie Polaneczky interviewed a nurse who’s also a lawyer, who told her that while Knott’s tweets may be deeply unprofessional, they don’t appear to violate the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act because “patients’ names and other identifiable was not shared.” However, medical ethicist Art Caplan told Polaneczky that he disagrees. If there’s information in the tweets for others to deduce who’s being discussed, he said, then it’s a clear HIPAA violation and a legal liability.
Now is probably a good time for HR leaders in the healthcare industry to review their BYOD and social-media policies, and perhaps schedule some refresher training.
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Say Hello to Your New Robot Boss

robot 1Earlier this month, HRE reported on the phenomenon of “de-skilling,” a term that’s really just code for “replacing employees with automation.” And while no one likes the idea of being usurped on the job by a robot, a new study suggests that some workers would be just fine with having one for a boss.

That’s what researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab found when they studied groups of two humans and one robot working together in a manufacturing environment. In fact, the authors found that human workers participating in their study actually preferred taking orders from an automaton, and that handing over the reins to a robot was the most efficient means of accomplishing the task at hand.

In this case, the task at hand was assembling Legos, in an experiment that replicated a factory setting. Only the human workers could put together the Legos, which had to be brought from a “fetch” station to a “build” station. While only humans could assemble the Legos, either a human or robot could fetch them.

“In our research we were seeking to find that sweet spot for ensuring that the human workforce is both satisfied and productive,” said Matthew Gombolay, a PhD student at CSAIL, and lead author of the study, in a statement.

“We discovered that the answer is to actually give machines more autonomy, if it helps people to work together more fluently with robot teammates.”

Gombolay and his team reached this conclusion by assigning groups of two humans and one robot working in one of three conditions. In the manual scenario, all tasks were allocated by a human. In another, fully autonomous environment, all duties were assigned by the robot. In the third, semi-autonomous setting, one human consigned jobs to him or herself, while a robot gave tasks to the other human.

The fully autonomous condition proved to be the most effective in terms of getting the job done, and the method most preferred by the human workers, who were more likely to say the bots “better understood them” and “improved the efficiency of the team,” according to the authors.

If this all seems a bit strange, and maybe even a tad scary, fear not. This MIT experiment isn’t the first step toward a workplace run by cold, lifeless cyborgs, said Gombolay.

Putting a robot in charge, as the MIT team did, simply means that tasks are delegated, scheduled and coordinated via a human-generated algorithm, he said.

“Instead of coming up with a plan by hand, it’s about developing tools to help create plans automatically.”

This algorithm, he said, can also conduct on-the-fly re-planning, enabling the instant development of an alternate schedule for a task if a new part arrives or a machine malfunctions, for example.

Down the road, similar algorithms may have utility for human/human collaborative efforts such as scheduling hospital resources; search-and-rescue drones; and even situations involving human and robot cooperation, in which the robot could aid with discrete building and construction tasks, Gombolay added.

Hmm. Such applications could very well be useful in some industries, and may still leave some work for humans to do in the future as well. Maybe we don’t have to cede total control to our new robotic overlords just yet.

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Transforming Learning Through Mobile

Of course, it only seems natural that Qualcomm, which produces the chips used in mobile devices, would be leading the way in the move to mobile learning.

168769841During yesterday’s opening-day morning keynote at i4cp’s 2014 Conference at the Fairmont Scottsdale Princess, Tamar Elkeles, vice president of learning and organizational development at Qualcomm, shared some of the ways Qualcomm (which has 31,000 people around the world) is applying learning to mobile devices.

Elkeles advised those attending the conference not to get left behind. “Mobile is not a fad,” she said. “It’s changing how we live, how we work and how we play.” (In the world of learning, Elkeles’ insight and advice carries a lot of weight.)

As the next generation of workers enters the workforce, Elkeles said, they’re not going to put up with sitting through a training class. They’ll be entering the workforce having done everything on mobile. So they’re going to expect that’s how learning is going to occur at any employer they work for.

One interesting stat she shared: Ten percent of those between ages 0 and 1 are using mobile devices. That’s right, 0 and 1. True, she said, they may not know how to read yet. But, holding up a single finger, Elkeles explained that’s all one needs to navigate the world of mobility, even if it’s limited to launching a Disney YouTube video.

Another stat she shared: By 2015, more than 300 million pre-K-through-12 school children will have mobile devices.

Referring to those now entering the workforce as the App Generation, Elkeles said these workers are beginning to transform the way Qualcomm thinks about its culture. Today, it’s one-size-fits-one, with people wanting their information right away.

What’s the best way people go about getting information these days? Google Search, she said. “You don’t go to the HR person. You don’t go to the policy manual. You go to search.”

In light of that, Elkeles added, Qualcomm has eliminated thousands of webpages that can now be accessed on search.

Elkeles told attendees she doesn’t know where things are going, but “we’re definitely at the beginning of something that’s big, and we know it’s going to be very disruptive.”

Apps represent the future of learning at Qualcomm, particularly for areas such as:

  • Employee orientation. (Let them download the app, before they’ve even started.)
  • Leadership development. “Your executives are mobile employees anyway,” Elkeles said.
  • Mandatory training. (Every two years, a certain number of folks at Qualcomm have to get recertified on sexual-harassment training — so by putting the training on a mobile device, they can now do it at the airport.)
  • Audio/language training. Elkeles cited the example of Café Coffee Day, an Indian coffee chain that uses an audio app to teach baristas English-language skills.

Elkeles walked attendees through a few of the apps Qualcomm has created, ranging from the entertaining (where an employee can create a photo image that shows him or her standing next to the company’s CEO) to the bit-more-practical (and also the most popular) Qmap, which enables employees to find their way around Qualcomm’s main campus and other global facilities.

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