Category Archives: HR profession

Breaking Into the Boy’s Club

Whether it’s a result of not seeking out women workers or not being able to attract them, or a combination of factors, some fields remain heavily male-dominated.

Many of these same industries—construction, automotive and trucking, to name just three—are facing a worker shortage fueled in no small part by scores of retiring baby boomers.

It seems that at least some of these traditionally male-centric sectors are focusing more closely on female talent in an effort to fill the vacuum.

Earlier this month, for example, the Iron Workers Union and the Ironworker Management Progressive Action Cooperative Trust began offering a new paid maternity leave benefit to members.

According to a statement from the organization, it is “the first to introduce a generous paid maternity leave benefit in the building trades,” where adequate paid maternity leave is “virtually unheard of.”

The new policy includes six months of pre-delivery maximum benefit and six to eight weeks of post-delivery benefit, according to the union. In addition, members are eligible for up to six weeks of paid leave after the birth of the child and two additional weeks for Cesarean deliveries, regardless of what was covered pre-delivery.

The Washington Post recently detailed the new Iron Workers Union policy, noting that all baby boomers will be over the age of 65 by the year 2029, which means one-fifth of the U.S. population will have reached retirement age.

Iron Workers President Eric Dean feels that offering benefits such as paid maternity leave finds the organization well-positioned for the ongoing boomer exodus.

“The whole world is suffering the baby boomer retirement tsunami,” Dean told the Post. “All the construction trades are in competition for capable people. Wouldn’t it be a distinct advantage for us to be the first?”

These trades have other issues to contend with, of course.

The same article points out that “millennials, the workers who would replace [boomers], aren’t as interested in pursuing careers in the trades.” Enrollment in vocational education has dropped over the last three decades as well, according to the Post, adding that the current opioid epidemic “has zapped some of the male workforce, because men are more likely than women to both use and overdose on illicit drugs.”

Other fields with predominantly male workforces—such as the trucking and automotive technician sectors—see such factors draining their applicant pools as well.

“There’s a shortage of high-end, heavily trained individuals who can do diagnostic work,” Tony Molla, vice president of the Automotive Service Association, told the Post. “We’re graduating about 30,000 new technicians a year, mostly men, but that’s not enough to keep up with attrition.”

In response, automakers have been funneling more corporate sponsorships to groups that work to recruit female trainees, such as the Automotive Women’s Alliance Foundation and the Car Care Council Women’s Board, according to the paper. Meanwhile, some trucking companies have begun to hire “female driver liaisons” in addition to creating support groups geared toward female truckers, the Post reports.

Naturally, there’s no promise that these efforts will pay off in the form of more female workers in male-dominated industries. And there’s still the long-standing, problematic perception that women “aren’t cut out” for some work; a stigma that can be extremely difficult to shake for those who do pursue careers in certain fields. But there seems to be an acknowledgement in some corners that change is needed if these industries wish to survive, as Dean told the Post.

“We have to innovate,” he said, “if we want different results.”

Trumps Appoints NLRB’s Miscimarra

In case you missed it, late last week President Donald Trump  appointed Philip Miscimarra as the permanent head of the National Labor Relations Board, a role the Republican had been holding since Trump nominated him to temporarily fill the position shortly after his inauguration.

According to Reuters, Miscimarra, a former partner at Morgan Lewis & Bockius, was first appointed to the Board in 2013 by then-President Barack Obama “and has routinely broken with his Democratic colleagues on key labor issues.”

We first wrote about Miscimarra back in February, when legal experts weighed in on where they thought his appointment would take the board:

Michael Lotito, a partner and co-chair of the Workplace Policy Institute at Littler Mendelson, calls the appointment of Miscimarra the “first step” in a process of returning the board to balancing the rights of employees with the legitimate interests of employers as set forth in the National Labor Relations Act.

“Over the past five years, the NLRB has reversed over 4,500 years of precedent, often over the dissent of [new chair]  Miscimarra,” Lotito says. “Now, the new administration must appoint two new members to the Board to fill the vacancies that exist.  Hopefully, that will happen soon followed by quick confirmation. Only then, with the board at full strength, will it be able to tackle critical workplace issues needing a reasoned resolution.”

Steve Bernstein, a partner at Fisher Phillips in Tampa, Fla., says that, as the NLRB’s lone Republican for the past several months, Miscimarra  has authored some of the more vigorous and compelling dissents seen in some time:

“An examination of those dissents may offer a roadmap of what we might expect going forward, as the board moves toward a return to full strength,” he says.

A number of Miscimarra ‘s dissents call for greater clarity in the standards to be applied by his agency, Bernstein says, along with a more flexible approach to evaluating employer policies that takes into account the unique justifications for the policies themselves.

More recently, Miscimarra  has applied that “common-sense” approach to a number of NLRB doctrines, ranging from the employee status of graduate teaching assistants to the supervisory status of patient care coordinators, Bernstein says. Miscimarra, he adds, also has challenged controversial decisions invalidating binding arbitration provisions and limiting an employer’s right to insist upon confidentiality in workplace investigations.

“At the same time,” Berstein says, “he has openly questioned the NLRB’s apparent departure from long-standing precedent with respect to doctrine governing the use of permanent striker replacements, along with the test for joint-employer status.”

 

EEOC: HR Leader Wrongly Fired

The American Dental Association illegally fired both its CHRO and chief legal counsel after they alerted the association board about employment discrimination occurring at the Chicago-based trade group, says the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

The agency on Friday announced a $1.95 million settlement with the association to resolve charges that the group illegally retaliated against the the chief legal counsel, Tamra Kempf, and the association’s  chief HR official, whom it did not name.

The two had raised concerns about violation of laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of age and disability, the EEOC said, without providing details.

Beyond the discrimination, the retaliation was of great concern, said Julianne Bowman, director of the EEOC’s Chicago District office.

“The position of the EEOC is that human resource  professionals and in-house lawyers who advise their employers to abide by anti-discrimination laws are engaged in protected activities, and any retaliation against them for doing so is illegal,” Bowman said in the EEOC statement.

The dental association contended the two former employees’ complaints are “without merit,”but said it settled to avoid the costs and risks of a trial.

In addition to the fines, which will go to the former employees, the association agreed to take “proactive measures” to prevent future discrimination and retaliation. It also will provide training in discrimination law for employees in the association’s Chicago headquarters,the EEOC said.

Studying Sleep at Goodyear

According to Dr. Brent Pawlecki, the goal of his Thursday morning presentation here at Human Resource Executive‘s Health & Benefits Leadership Conference (held April 19 – 21 at the Aria Resort & Casino in Las Vegas) was to “make the case for why sleep is important” to employees’ health.

Making that case was also part of his plan when he took over as chief health officer at Akron, Ohio-based Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. six years ago.

At the time, the company has begun investing more in the health of its 69,000 employees around the world. Pawlecki was brought in to “build a culture of health” at the organization. When he took the job in 2011, he was charged with helping Goodyear to better define its overall healthy strategy.

“We said, we’re a global company, with well over 20,000 U.S.-based employees,” says Pawlecki. “We need to build a strong foundation of healthy employees here in the U.S.”

Part of that building process was addressing the impact of sleep, or the lack thereof, on Goodyear employees. Why study sleep?

“I was at a conference where I attended a presentation on how sleep affects workers,” says Pawlecki. “And I thought that, if we can get our employees thinking and talking about sleep issues—which could be caused by or contributing to underlying health issues— then maybe we can get them to focus on those larger issues.”

Enter Big Health, the San Francisco-based provider of the Sleepio sleep health app.

Sharing the stage with Pawlecki was Jenna Carl, medical director at Big Health. She talked about the “hidden nature” of behavioral health problems, and how tackling sleep issues might “offer a gateway to solving mental health problems” and subsequently creating healthier and happier workers.

Those suffering from insomnia, for instance, often find themselves more easily irritated and more sensitive to stress, she says.

“Insomnia also affects the frontal cortex—the CEO of the brain—which is responsible for decision making,” continues Carl. “And, behaviorally, those with sleep problems fall into a vicious cycle. They start worrying about not sleeping, and/or might start using more caffeine or alcohol, which actually have a negative impact on the ability to sleep.”

Naturally, employees trying to work their way through such problems are going to be less than their best while on the job. Pawlecki and Goodyear were acutely aware of this reality when bringing in Big Health to help conduct a sleep awareness campaign, “designed to engage good and poor sleepers,” says Carl.

The campaign began with encouraging employees to take a sleep test, the results of which led to creating personalized plans for employees who took part.

In getting employees to participate, “it’s important to know your employee population in order to know how to reach them,” says Carl.

Goodyear, for example, has 24,000 U.S. employees spread across plants and retail locations. Roughly 60 percent of these associates have no company email address, says Pawlecki.

As such, the initial sleep awareness campaign included home mailers and in-person communications in the form of posters and animated videos geared toward these workers, as well as providing intranet articles and sending emails detailing the campaign to those with Goodyear email accounts.

Overall, the campaign netted 2,798 employees who completed the sleep test, the majority of whom suffered from poor sleep, says Carl, adding that about one third of these workers could meet the clinical criteria for insomnia, while around half were experiencing less-than-optimal sleep. Plant workers, she says, struggled the most.

These plant employees also reported that poor sleep impacted their productivity close to 28 percent of the time, with retail workers saying that sleep affects their productivity 23 percent of the time. Office workers said that inadequate rest took a toll on their work 21 percent of the time.

“This is a pretty significant impact,” says Carl, adding that Goodyear employees who used the Sleepio app and underwent cognitive therapy reported getting an additional five hours of sleep per week after using the application. Those same workers also saw their stress reduced by 54 percent, and experienced a 35 percent drop in anxiety.

“These are obviously big improvements,” says Carl, noting that these workers also reported productivity improvements in addition to improving their overall mental health.

“And that’s just from getting better sleep.”

Another Casualty at Fox News

Board members at 21st Century Fox this week took dramatic steps to end what was shaping up to be an epic HR train wreck at the media giant.

On Tuesday they dismissed Bill O’Reilly, popular host of “The O’Reilly Factor,” the  top-rated show on its top-rated cable outlet, the Fox News Channel. News stories recently have detailed sexual-harassment complaints that have piled up against O’Reilly, costing the network at least $13 million in settlements so far and more in than 50 advertisers as the unflattering headlines tarnished the Fox News brand. It was the latest chapter in a story that began with the ouster of Fox News CEO Roger Ailes last summer over similar allegations of rampant sexual harassment problems at Fox News.

The New York Times, which started the latest chain of events on April 1 by publishing the first accounts of sexual-harassment complaints against O’Reilly, said the decision to fire him was made by Rupert Murdoch and his two sons, who hold controlling interests in 21st Century Fox after an internal investigation found that several women had reported inappropriate conduct by O’Reilly. Murdoch, executive co-chairman of the 21st Century Fox board, also has been acting CEO of the Fox News unit since Ailes was fired in July 2016.

The decision came in a terse announcement: “After a thorough and careful review of the allegations, the Company and Bill O’Reilly have agreed that Bill O’Reilly will not be returning to the Fox News Channel.” The deal included severance payments of up to $25 million, several news organizations reported.

O’Reilly, who was in Italy on vacation when the news of his dismissal broke, expressed disappointment in a series of short statements that alluded to his longstanding contempt for “political correctness.”

“Over the past 20 years at Fox News, I have been extremely proud to launch and lead one of the most successful news programs in history, which has consistently informed and entertained millions of Americans and significantly contributed to building Fox into the dominant news network in television,” O’Reilly said in one statement published by Entertainment Weekly late on Tuesday. “It is tremendously disheartening that we part ways due to completely unfounded claims. But that is the unfortunate reality many of us in the public eye must live with today. I will always look back on my time at Fox with great pride in the unprecedented success we achieved and with my deepest gratitude to all my dedicated viewers. I wish only the best for Fox News Channel.”

 

Trump Takes on H1-B Visas

President Trump is expected to sign a new executive order today “aimed at making it harder for technology companies to recruit low-wage workers from foreign countries and undercut Americans looking for jobs,” according to the New York Times.

The order is expected to be signed during the president’s visit to a Wisconsin toolmaker today, and is a continuation of Trump’s line of attack from his campaign.

From the Times:

As a candidate, Mr. Trump often assailed the government’s H-1B visa program, under which the government admits 85,000 immigrants each year, mostly to work in high-tech jobs. Mr. Trump pledged to end the program, which he said was allowing companies to fire Americans and replace them with lower-cost foreign employees.

The president’s order, according to officials who spoke to the newspaper on the condition of anonymity, seeks changes to the program that would require applicants and their potential employers to demonstrate that the visas are going only to “the most highly skilled workers” in their fields.

As a result,  the H-1B visa would no longer be a cheap way for companies to replace American workers. But technology executives, who have argued that the program is vital to their ability to recruit talent, are likely to be frustrated by the change:

Robert D. Atkinson, president of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a research group sponsored by several tech companies, predicted in January that a crackdown on H-1B visas would be counterproductive.

“The effect would end up being exactly the opposite of what Trump wants,” he said. “Companies would go offshore, like Microsoft did with Vancouver, Canada,” to seek talent.

Earlier this week, Peter Cappelli, an HREonline.com columnist and Wharton professor, posted a column on the topic of H1-B visas and whom the program really benefits:

When we talk about programs like this one, the question of whether it is “good” or “bad” for the country is almost impossible to answer objectively. What we can answer is, good for whom and bad for whom? A new study by John Bound, Gaurav Khanna and Nicolas Morales  examines that question, and the results should be familiar to anyone who has studied supply and demand.

So who benefits?

The companies that employ them, leading to lower prices for the goods and services they produced and in turn benefits for consumers.

Who loses?

U.S. employees in computer science see their wages lower as a result. Here’s the finding that may be a surprise: College enrollment in IT programs declines when the H1-B visa program expands. Why should that be? Because there aren’t as many IT jobs available to U.S. workers, and wages for them are lower, so some students would otherwise pursue that field go elsewhere.

Cappelli says that, while the notion of bringing in foreign workers to make up for worker shortfalls makes sense in smaller countries, it doesn’t work in the U.S.:

Young people in particular are constantly trying to figure out where the jobs will be, colleges hunt for job-market niches where they can attract students and workers move thousands of miles if there are good jobs available. What we know from this study — which parallels what we learned years ago in fields such as nursing — is that bringing in foreign workers slows down the process through which the U.S. labor market adjusts to new demands.

That seems to be the case for the H1-B program and the IT industry.

Cappelli says the fact that so many U.S. IT companies seem so reliant on these foreign temp workers points to a definite problem here. It remains to be seen how Trump’s anticipated order will solve that problem.

 

Another Strange Turn at Fox News

The news hasn’t been kind to Fox News lately.

As a messy sexual harassment scandal began unfurling last year, the television network and its corporate parent, 21st Century Fox, were battered with unflattering headlines. Besieged with employee  suits alleging a systemic culture of sexual harassment and retaliation, the company had to spend $20 million last fall to settle claims from former star anchor Gretchen Carlson. Months earlier, Fox also had spent $40 million in a deal to dismiss network CEO Roger Ailes. Other sex-harassment cases against the company remain pending. But new ones keep coming.  Most recently, the storm returned after The New York Times on April 1 reported that sex-harassment claims were piling up against Bill O’Reilly, host of the news channel’s most popular show. The network has paid five women a total of $13million to settle their claims, the Times reorted.

Once again, Fox’s image took a beating.  So did revenue: This time, advertisers left the channel to preserve their own reputations. As a high-profile law firm conducted an investigation on behalf of management, some news outlets reported O’Reilly could be ousted.

We can only imagine how challenging life is today in the Fox HR department.

We may not have to wonder. If one news report is true, HR leaders at 21st Century Fox took a bold step to change the company culture: they launched a training program that features a video that Americans have come to know well: The infamous “Access Hollywood”outtakes featuring host Billy Bush exchanging salacious banter with now-President Donald Trump.

The newspaper reported  that Fox has shown the tape as a regular part of employee seminars warning against sexual harassment.

Hollywood Reporter said employee reaction has at times been incredulous: “There was an audible gasp in the room, like, ‘Can you believe this is happening?’”one tipster told the newspaper.

Wells Fargo Shows Its Claws

Months after the revelations that Wells Fargo had engaged in highly questionable (some say illegal) practices, including creating fraudulent accounts, its board of directors has taken action to recoup some of the compensation from the bank’s leaders during the time the nefarious schemes were ongoing.

According to the New York Times, an additional $75 million in compensation will be “clawed back” from the two executives the company’s says bear the majority of the blame for the scandal over fraudulent accounts: the bank’s former chief executive, John G. Stumpf, and its former head of community banking, Carrie L. Tolstedt:

The clawbacks — or forced return of pay and stock grants — are the largest in banking history and among the largest in corporate America. A four-person committee of Wells Fargo’s directors investigated the extensive fraud.

The Times says that while the amount of money customers lost was relatively small — the company has refunded $3.2 million — the scope of the fraud was huge: 5,300 bankers were fired for creating as many as two million unwanted bank and credit card accounts:

In one detail revealed by the board’s report, a branch manager had a teenage daughter with 24 accounts and a husband with 21.

According to Time magazine, Wells has instituted several corporate and business changes since the problems became known nationwide. Wells has changed its sales practices, and called tens of millions of customers to check on whether they truly opened the accounts in question.

Wells Fargo board Chairman Stephen Sanger also acknowledged in a Monday conference call with reporters that board members “could have pushed more forcefully to change leadership at the community bank,” according to USA Today.

While conceding he could not “promise perfection” in the efforts to regain trust from customers and regulators, Sloan said, “I’m very confident we’re on the right track.”

 

Getting Under Employees’ Skin

No, this story isn’t about a new and unpopular workplace policy sweeping through the nation’s workplaces.

At least not yet.

The Associated Press is reporting today on a Swedish company that turns its willing employees into “cyborgs” by inserting microchips into them:

What could pass for a dystopian vision of the workplace is almost routine at the Swedish startup hub Epicenter. The company offers to implant its workers and startup members with microchips the size of grains of rice that function as swipe cards: to open doors, operate printers, or buy smoothies with a wave of the hand.

Epicenter’s co-founder and CEO Patrick Mesterton told the AP the move will bring a heightened sense of ease for workers:

“The biggest benefit I think is convenience,” he said. “It basically replaces a lot of things you have, other communication devices, whether it be credit cards or keys.”

According to the AP, the small implants use Near Field Communication technology, the same as in contactless credit cards or mobile payments: “When activated by a reader a few centimeters (inches) away, a small amount of data flows between the two devices via electromagnetic waves. The implants are ‘passive,’ meaning they contain information that other devices can read, but cannot read information themselves.”

The technology is not new, of course, but it has never been used to tag employees on a broad scale before, and the AP says Epicenter and a handful of other companies “are the first to make chip implants broadly available.”
Way back in 2006, however, colleague Mark McGraw tackled the topic of tagging workers:

Cincinnati-based private video-surveillance company CityWatcher.com recently embedded silicon chips in four of its employees, as the company tested the technology in an effort to control access to a room where it holds security video footage for government agencies and police.

The dime-sized chips, manufactured by Delray Beach, Fla.-based VeriChip Corp., were implanted into the employees’ arms, says Sean Darks, CityWatcher CEO, after the company explored various types of biometric applications such as fingerprint and handprint identification systems. CityWatcher turned to radio-frequency identification chips, a less costly alternative to typical biometric systems, to “make security improvements,” he says, and eliminate the possibility of employees losing or misplacing proximity cards or other forms of identification.

RFID chips are inexpensive radio transmitters that emit a unique identifying signal. The chips are commonly used for tracking merchandise in transit, but they can also be implanted in pets to identify them in the event they’re separated from their owners and can be used in humans for medical purposes — to link patients to their medical records in emergency situations, for instance.

However, CityWatcher’s implementation of RFID is the first known case in which U.S. workers have been “tagged” electronically as a way of identifying them, and is likely to add to a growing controversy surrounding RFID , predicted as one of the next big growth industries.

Not everyone McGraw talked to for the piece was excited at the prospect of having more workers walking around with chips inserted under their skin.

“Whether or not implanting  … chips in humans becomes a common workplace security measure remains to be seen,” said Liz McIntyre, a critic of the technology and the communications director of Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering, a nonprofit group focused on consumer privacy issues.  “This is just the beginning,” says McIntyre.
Eleven years later, though, that trend is apparently still in its beginning stages, as the only progress seems to be in the chip’s size shrinking from a dime to a grain of rice, not in expanding the number of companies using such technology.

 

Taking On Banks Over Gender Pay

Figured the day before Equal Pay Day (that’s right, that’s tomorrow!) would be a perfect time to tell you about a pretty interesting teleconference I sat in on recently.

The topic, you guessed it, was gender-pay equity. Two women — Natasha Lamb, managing director and lead filer of gender-pay resolutions for Arjuna Capital, and Former Lt. Gov. of Massachusetts Evelyn Murphy, founder and president of The WAGE Project Inc. (an activist group dedicated to gender-pay equity) — were filling listeners in on Arjuna’s next bold move: making the banks come clean on what it sees as their backward pay practices when it comes to women.

See, Arjuna was the activist investment firm (with U.S. headquarters in Boston) that took the lead last year in getting seven of nine targeted tech companies (eBay, Intel, Apple, Amazon, Expedia, Microsoft and Adobe) to include data on their pay practices in their proxy statements.

Now, said Lamb in the teleconference, her firm is going after six top banks and credit-card companies that it has financial stakes in — Wells Fargo, Citigroup, Bank of America, JP Morgan, MasterCard and American Express — to pressure them to do the same by officially considering its proposal in this year’s annual proxy statement.

Unfortunately, she pointed out, all but MasterCard are opposing Arjuna’s proposal requesting reports from the banks on the percentage pay gap between male and female employees across race and ethnicity (including base, bonus and equity compensation; policies to address that gap; the methodology used; and quantitative reduction targets).

Citigroup specifically came out and said in its proxy statement that such gender-pay-gap reporting would be “costly and time-consuming.” In fact, here is Citigroup’s entire board recommendation from that statement:

“We remain committed to our ongoing efforts to promote diversity in the workplace and believe we are making demonstrable progress in building a diverse company and compensating our employees based on performance. [Arjuna’s proposal] calls for a report on the company’s policies and goals to reduce the gender-pay gap, which would be costly and time-consuming, and in light of our many efforts in this area, would not offer stockholders meaningful additional information. As such, the proposal would not enhance the company’s existing commitment to an inclusive culture or meaningfully further its goal and efforts in support of workplace diversity; therefore, the board recommends that you vote AGAINST this proposal.”

That said, however, Citigroup spokesman Mark Costiglio did tell me his company has “had productive discussions with Arjuna Capital on its proposal and looks forward to continued engagement on this issue.” So we’ll see.

During the teleconference, Lamb lit into the entire banking industry, with direct reference to Citigroup:

“You just can’t get around the fact that big banks are in the stone ages when it comes to gender-pay equity.  Big tech stepped up in 2016 and took real action to address the legitimate concerns of long-term shareholders and women.  Yet the banks are sticking their heads in the sand, which makes you wonder: What do they have to hide?

“It’s a continuation of the status quo where bank leadership paternalistically pats investors on the head and tells them to trust them.  Unfortunately, we already know that banks are among the worst offenders when it comes to how women are treated in the workplace.  How can we hold Amazon to one standard on gender equity while Citigroup pretends it’s 1957, not 2017?”

Last year, eBay, Google and Facebook were all opposed to the pay transparency and improvement campaign. But, “when peer group after peer group agreed to it,” Lamb said, “eBay actually switched to 51-percent approval.” Though Google and Facebook remain opposed, requests to them have been resubmitted, she added.

The business case for pay equity can’t be denied, Murphy chimed in. “In the last seven years, [it’s] been very strong,” she said.

One caller asked if the tech companies have actually done more than simply become more transparent. “Have they taken more steps to close the gender gap?” she asked. Lamb’s response:

“Yes, they have.”

But the banks are going to be a tougher nut to crack, since finance is a heavily male-dominated field with one of the highest disparities of all industries examined by Glassdoor, the release points out.

Apparently, Arjuna is up for the challenge.

Meanwhile, if you’re interested in a silghtly different take on this issue, you might want to tune into this roundtable discussion tomorrow at 11 a.m. PDT hosted by PayScale and moderated by its vice president, Lydia Frank.

The gist of that discussion, Gap Analysis: What Equal Pay Day Gets Wrong, will center on the premise that the oft-quoted “women earn 80 cents for every $1 earned by men” is actually an unfair representation of the gender-pay problem because it doesn’t reflect men’s and women’s pay for the same job (which PayScale claims is actually 98 cents on the dollar).

PayScale believes that the pay gap is, instead, an opportunity gap since women tend to find themselves in lower-paying jobs than men and are also left behind men when it comes to leadership roles or promotions in the workplace.

Wherever the truth lies in all of this, I say it certainly doesn’t hurt to get more employers, whatever their industry, to open their books and start tackling discrepancies.