Category Archives: hiring

Leveraging Assessment Software at Tenet

No one wants to be hospitalized for a serious illness. But if that happens to be your fate, I’m sure you’d find it comforting to know that the nurses caring for you were at the very least a good fit for their jobs.

Certainly, the folks in Tenet Healthcare’s HR department are operating (forgive the pun) under that assumption. In a session entitled “Tenet Healthcare Uses New Assessments to Reduce Nursing Turnover” at the HR Technology® Conference, Tenet’s Vice President of HR Joe Gage shared how the hospital successfully leveraged assessment software to ensure the right nurses were being hired for their jobs.

For many in the audience, I suspect hiring has yet to become a high priority, with unemployment still near 10 percent.  But as Gage reminded attendees, it continues to be very much an issue for hospital, which still stuggle to fill key nursing positions.

Gage told attendees on Thursday afternoon how Tenet uses PeopleAnswers to build custom Performance Profiles based on incumbent population for its hospital units, such as emergency, medical/surgery or critical care units. The net result of this was a more rigorous, though not necessarily time-consuming, assessment process that led to an improvement in quality of hire and a reduction in early turnover of 47 percent over an 18-month period.

Having the best talent in place is obviously good news for patients and hospital administrators alike. But Gage noted that it’s also good for recruiters, who automatically receive candidates in their applicant racking system (Taleo, in this case) who are ranked by fit.

Gage noted how the software also supported Tenet’s onboarding process by generating a guide that tells managers about new hires, including their likes and dislikes and how they respond to stress.

Among the various components of a comprehensive talent-management suite, assessment software certainly isn’t the first piece that comes to mind. But Tenet’s presentation hammered home its importance—especially in a hospital setting.

States Beat Ivies (No, We’re Not Talking Football)

After reading the front-page story in the Wall Street Journal today entitled “Employers Favor State Schools for Hires,” I called the National Association of Colleges and Employers to get their take on the study’s findings, particularly the bias of recruiters toward state schools.

“After I read the article, my reaction was ‘no duh!’ NACE Director of Strategic and Foundation Research Edwin Koc told me.

Recruiters are going to state schools because of the size of their student populations, Koc says. “You’re going to go to Penn State for accounting candidates because it’s the most efficient way to recruit them, not because of the quality,” he explains.

Of course, employers are paying a price limiting the number of schools they have a presence at. They’re missing some strong candidates.

Despite this, Koc doesn’t believe recruiters are going to change their way anytime soon, even as the economy gets some footing. “Once you incorporate these efficiencies, you’re not going to do things differently until you’re dissatisfied with the candidates you’re finding,” he says.

For those who don’t subscribe to the WSJ, the five schools recruiters favor most are: Penn State, Texas A&M, University of Illinois, Purdue and Arizona State.

Jobs Slow to Return, Even for Tech

Catch today’s front-page New York Times story, entitled “Once a Dynamo, the Tech Sector is Slow to Hire?”

As the nation struggles to put people back to work, the story reports, “even high-tech companies have been slow to hire, a sign of just how difficult it will be to address persistently high joblessness.”

The piece points out that the disappointing hiring trend raises questions about whether the tech industry can help power a recovery and sustain American job growth in the coming years. “Its tentativeness has prompted economists to ask, ‘If high tech isn’t hiring, who will?’ “ the story says.

For areas such as computer systems design and Internet publishing, the story notes, job growth has been slow during the past year. Employment in areas such data processing and software publishing has actually fallen.

Perhaps it’s no coincidence then that I found another story in my mailbox this morning from eweek.com entitled, “H-1B Visa Cap for 2011 Has Not Been Met Yet.”

“With less than one month before fiscal year 2011 begins in October,” the story reports, “there are about 30,100 available visas for technology companies to apply for through the temporary work visa program …”

A few years ago that was unthinkable, thanks to the thirst of high-tech firms for talent.  (In years’ past, these visas used to be gone in a blink of an eye.)  But today, it’s simply further proof of how cautious businesses are these days when it comes to adding jobs, even those in the high-octane sectors like tech.

Everybody’s an Intern!

Came across an interesting legal alert from the folks at Jackson Lewis today reminding employers to pay attention to the rules and regulations governing the use of interns.

Mind you, we’ve heard, read and written about this fairly regularly through the years, but what caught my attention was just how prevalent interns may be in American businesses this fall. Seems the recession’s layoff victims who’ve given up trying to get traditional full-time work anytime soon will be trolling for internships right alongside college students.

Many of you have probably heard that as well, too. I had. I just didn’t know how many there might be, and what a range there would be in years of experience and age.

A survey by CareerBuilder,  included in the alert and released earlier this month, shows more than half of the employers polled saying they’ll probably hire interns as full-time, permanent employees. It also shows nearly a fourth of them saying they’re seeing workers with more than 10 years of experience and those ages 50 and older applying for internships at their companies.

Better check out the criteria from Jackson Lewis on how these “unorthodox” interns should be treated, and paid or not paid. It may be great to have the pick of the litter for positions you’re opening in the coming months, but make sure you don’t crash this handy system by breaking the law.