Posts belonging to Category benefits



Promising News for Gen Yers

Millennials are apparently in a lot better shape when it comes to tucking money away for retirement than many of us might have thought. In fact, if we’re to believe the latest data from the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, a strong case could be made that this workforce demographic definitely has its act together.

475319371(1)According to TCRS’ 15th Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey, 70 percent of millennials are already saving for retirement either through employer-sponsored plans, such as 401(k)s, or through plans outside the workplace. What’s more, the median age at which these workers begin to save for retirement is 22. Pretty impressive, no?

The study also revealed that millennials who are participating in employer-sponsored 401(k)s and the like are contributing a median of 8 percent of their annual salary into those plans. (At companies offering a match, the salary deferral rate hits 10 percent!)

In actual dollars, the annual retirement savings for millennial households jumped from $9,000 in 2007 to $32,000 in 2014, an increase that obviously is connected to the timing of their entry into the workforce (many on the heels of the Great Recession).

Others have studied this issue before, but I don’t recall seeing anything nearly as upbeat as these TCRS figures. In June, Wells Fargo released the results of its 2014 Wells Fargo Millennials Study. That survey found 55 percent of millennials reporting they were saving for retirement, compared to 45 percent who were not. (Unlike the TCRS study, that study included those currently not in the workforce, perhaps explaining the discrepancy.)

No doubt, more than a few factors are behind TCRS’ extremely encouraging numbers, including the fact that many millennials are fully aware Social Security won’t be there for them (at least in a meaningful way) when they retire. (Indeed, more than eight in 10 respondents said they believe that will be the case). But I have to imagine at the top of the list of the various drivers here is the widespread adoption of automatic enrollment, a relatively newer development.

I spoke to TCRS President Catherine Collinson the other day to get her take on the findings. As you might imagine, she said she was “enormously pleased” with the high savings rate among millennials. “It’s encouraging to see they’re getting such a head start, compared to older generations,” she pointed out.

Looking at the results, Collinson said, there’s little question millennials take retirement benefits very seriously and consider these offerings much more than just a nice-to-have. Indeed, one statistic in TCRS’ study found that three out of four millennials said they consider it a major reason for accepting a job offer. So if employers don’t have competitive offerings today, they would be well served to close that gap soon.

The other thing in the report worth noting is the importance these workers place on information and advice, an area that continues to be something of a weak spot for many organizations. Nearly three-quarters (73 percent) of the respondents in the TCRS study said they would like to receive more education and advice on how to achieve their retirement goals, compared to 65 percent for Gen X workers and 57 percent for baby boomers.

On this front, Collinson pointed out, employers need to take greater advantage of the innovations that are out there in the provider community. “Providers are always innovating,” she said, “but there appears to be a disconnect between those innovations and what plan sponsors are actually doing.”

Certainly, that’s a point plan sponsors might want to consider as they formulate their strategies for 2015.

A Few Surprises in Study on Hourly Workers

490136049 -- gavel and clockI met with some folks from St. Louis-based Equifax Workforce Solutions during the Society for Human Resource Management’s conference in Orlando (June 22 through 25) and they shared with me some stats they compiled recently reflecting the potential impact of the Affordable Care Act that even they admitted had some surprises in them.

Working toward Jan. 1, 2015, when the majority of the ACA’s employer mandate takes effect, the company had just released its Equifax Workforce Solutions June 2014 report, highlighting “key indicators of how the ACA will affect business[es] and what they can do to ensure compliance [thereby avoiding penalties] as the regulations continue to go into effect,” as Mike Psenka, senior vice president of Workforce Analytics for Equifax Workforce Solutions (formerly TALX), put it.

For the record, and some important reading, here is the press release and here is the infographic, based on Equifax data culled from 500 million consumers and 81 million businesses worldwide.

Surprisingly — and in keeping with employers making employee-schedule-and-status adjustments to prepare for the ACA’s mandate that all employees working an average of 30 hours or more per week be offered healthcare coverage — 66 percent of the current U.S. workforce is now hourly, accounting for more than 73.6 million active employees, and 59 percent of them are working more than 30 hours per week, according to the study. (Those numbers were higher than anticipated, the folks from Equifax told me.)

Remember, for these workers, employers must track hours for each employee over a 3-to-12-month measurement period to determine healthcare-coverage eligibility. The study found average workloads vary greatly by industry and can be a key indicator of workforce eligibility. “For example,” the report states, “hourly employees in the finance industry work an average of 37 hours per week while those in the restaurant industry work an average of 23 hours per week.”

Also somewhat surprising — to me as well — was the fact that 71 percent of hourly employees have been at their jobs longer than 12 months, which represents “a significant number of workers who may become eligible for coverage after their employer’s first measurement period,” the report says.

And don’t forget employers must also offer affordable coverage to all eligible employees, meaning the monthly premium cannot exceed 9.5 percent of the employee’s income. Based on the average hourly pay rate by industry, as computed by Equifax, estimated maximum premiums can range from $108.80 per month (in the restaurant industry) to $251.20 per month (in the healthcare industry).

The goal here in releasing these stats, Psenka said, is not only to offer employers a few more tools for protection from potential penalties, “but also [to] ensure their valued employees receive appropriate — and affordable — coverage.”

Just bear in mind, as was underscored in an otherwise enjoyable, stress-free SHRM meeting, the clock is ticking and time to get this whole hourly, ACA-eligibility thing right is running out.

Preventing 401(k) “Leakage”

leakWhen employees change jobs, their retirement funds tend to spring a leak. New analysis from the Employee Benefit Research Institute reveals that of the three primary types of “leakages” that occur with 401(k) accumulations among workers age 65 and younger (loans, hardship withdrawals and cash-outs when changing jobs), cash-outs when changing jobs represents two-thirds of this leakage.

EBRI found (using its proprietary Retirement Income Projection Security Model) that the combined impact of these three types of leakages on 401(k) accumulations at age 65 of younger workers with at least 30 years of 401(k) eligibility reduced the likelihood that these workers would be able to achieve an 80-percent income replacement rate at retirement by 8.8 percentage points for those in the lowest-income quartile and by 7 percentage points for those in the highest-income quartile.

Leakage has been a real problem among 401(k) participants: A study released last year by online financial firm HelloWallet found that penalized 401(k) withdrawals increased from $36 billion in 2004 to almost $60 billion in 2010, and that one in four Americans planned to tap their retirement accounts to meet current expenses. We’ve written about the potential risks of hardship withdrawals from 401(k) accounts and what some companies are doing to try and discourage employees from doing this.

Is restricting or eliminating the ability of employees to withdraw money from their retirement accounts the answer? Jack VanDerhei, EBRI’s research director, says doing this could have consequences that end up doing more harm than good. Here’s what he had to say during recent testimony before the ERISA Advisory Council:

This analysis needs to be accompanied by a very strong caveat that there are clear data gaps that will need to be filled,” said EBRI Research Director Jack VanDerhei. “For example, we have found in previous research that participants in plans with a loan option have higher contribution rates than those without such access, and a similar relationship may exist with respect to the availability of hardship withdrawals. Removing or restricting these plan options would likely reduce levels of 401(k) participation or access, and that could result in a significant drop in retirement savings for some employees eligible for participation in a 401(k) plan.”

 

Now Serving: Free College Degrees

150px-Starbucks_Corporation_Logo_2011_svgIf you happen to notice your local Starbucks barista acting even more upbeat and happy than normal, it may not caffeine-related.

Starbucks employees nationwide will be eligible for a free college education through Arizona State University’s online program beginning this fall, according to AZCentral.com:

The new initiative, touted as the first of its kind, will allow many of Starbucks’ 135,000 workers to graduate debt free from ASU with no requirement to repay or stay on with the company. The funding will come from a partnership between ASU and Starbucks.

ASU President Michael Crow is scheduled to appear in New York on Monday with Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz and U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to launch the Starbucks College Achievement Plan, as it is called.

“Starbucks decided human capital is one of the most important things they can invest in,” Crow said. “Everybody is concerned about what are the ways to get through college.”

In a news release, Schultz talked about “the fracturing of the American Dream.” He said: “There’s no doubt, the inequality within the country has created a situation where many Americans are being left behind. The question for all of us is, should we accept that, or should we try and do something about it.”

Kudos to Starbucks for this initiative, and here’s hoping many other organizations follow suit in an effort to increase the country’s knowledge base.

h/t to USA Today

 

 

Removing the Stigma Around Working Dads

HRE has done its share of stories on the plight of working fathers in recent years. But with Father’s Day approaching this Sunday, I figure it might be a good time to revisit this important, but frequently below-the-radar, topic.

I suspect that line of thinking also went into the White House’s scheduling of its first-ever conference on the challenges facing working dads earlier this week.

As Jason Furman and Betsey Stevenson of the Council of Economic Advisers wrote on the White House blog, the purpose of the conference was to explore “the state of working dads and how businesses can create a win-win culture to enable these fathers to be more involved parents and better employees.”

464194655In his remarks at the event, Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez told participants

“We need to do more to give people the tools to be responsible employees and good parents, so they don’t have to choose between the families they love and the jobs they need. We need to make sure people are able to put food on the table, but also to be at that table to eat dinner.”

Perez, who noted that the United States is one of only four nations that fails to offer any form of paid parental leave, went on to say: “We need to take on a whole host of issues that, frankly, have been absent from the national agenda. We have to start talking about child care, which is shockingly expensive in the United States. We have to lean in on paid leave, flexibility, work/life balance and family-friendly workplaces.” (In case you’re wondering, the other three nations are Swaziland, Lesotho and Papua New Guinea!)

Among those on hand to share their insights and experiences was New York Mets’ second baseman Dale Murphy, who – some of you may recall – received a lot of flak from radio commentators when he missed opening day in April to be with his wife for the birth of their son, Noah. (WFAN radio host Mike Francesa said on his show, “Go see your baby be born and come back. You’re a Major League Baseball player. You can hire a nurse to take care of the baby if your wife needs help.”)

As Time reports, Murphy told participants he doesn’t regret his decision: “When Noah asks me one day, what was it like when I was born, I think it will go so much farther that I cut his umbilical cord. Long after I won’t be a baseball player anymore, I will still be a father and a husband.”

Murphy, of course, isn’t your typical employee. (What baseball player is?) But his experience is still an important reminder that companies, in general, need to do more to remove the stigma associated with dads taking time off following the births of their children and to be there for other important milestones in their lives.

Personally, I wish I demonstrated a similar fortitude early in my career. Soon after my wife gave birth to our first son, I was scheduled to take my first business trip to Europe. At the time, I felt it would be detrimental to my career not to go—so I went. It’s a decision I very much regret making—and one, I might add, my wife, to this day, won’t let me forget.

I suspect these kinds of stories are more common than one would like to think, though hopefully, some of the stigma has diminished with the increasing realization that working dads, much like working moms, should be entitled to a more healthy work/life balance.

Speaking to this point, research published last month in Springer’s Journal of Business and Psychology, titled “The ‘New’ Dad: Navigating Fathering Identity Within Organizational Contexts,” makes the case that men continue to view their roles as fathers in the context of the workplace.

Through in-depth interviews with 31 fathers who all have working spouses, the researchers from the University of Massachusetts/Lowell, Northeastern University and Boston College found there continues to be a “strong cultural perspective that, when men become fathers, little will change for them on the work front.” (The researchers also point out that organizations, managers and co-workers still—italics are mine—do not fully recognize and openly appreciate men’s caregiving roles.)

Judging from this recent study and others that preceded it, companies still have a lot more work to do in terms of removing the stigma surrounding working dads. From my perspective, the White House conference seems to be a good step in the right direction. (I also would imagine that the topic will be addressed again on June 23, when the White House holds its Summit on Working Families.) But it probably also shouldn’t be overlooked that employers have the ability to do something about this issue today, as a small but growing number of forward-thinking companies (including some featured at this week’s conference) have already demonstrated.

Listening to the Data

I was having lunch the other day across the street from a noisy construction site. It wasn’t the best location in the world to read a book and enjoy a sandwich, but it was one of the few places I could find with some comfortable shade.

122399493As I sat there consuming my sandwich (and drink), I remember thinking to myself, “How in the world do these folks work eight hours straight with all that banging and clanging? I’m sure they were wearing protective gear to diffuse some of that noise, but despite the protection, it still had to be loud enough to drive a sane person crazy. (I eventually moved.)

If you’re like me, you probably know a few folks who’ve lost a decent amount of hearing as a result of the work they do. Some recognize they have a problem and have taken steps to remedy it, say by acquiring a hearing aid. Others are less aware, perhaps in denial or simply reluctant to do something about it. (According to the National Center on Hearing Assessment, only one in four people with hearing loss use hearing aids.)

When we think of the health and well-being of employees, a host of issues comes to mind. Diet. Exercise. Regular checkups. Hearing loss? Not really. But as a Better Hearing Institute press release sent out the other day to raise awareness on this issue points out, the problem of hearing loss is widespread, affecting more than 40 million Americans. And costly.

In an effort to bring attention to the issue, the American Tinnitus Association recently sent out its own press release, encouraging both employers and employees to be proactive. It urged employers to develop engineering controls to reduce overall noise output and implement administrative procedures to minimize workers’ noise exposure. Meanwhile, it asked workers to take control of their hearing health by using appropriate ear and noise protectors.

Of course, before either of these things are going to happen, employers and employees alike are going to have to get on the same page and acknowledge that a noise problem exists. Soon-to-be-released research suggests there’s a definite disconnect here between the perceptions of the two.

According to a survey of 1,500 full-time workers and nearly 500 benefits professionals by EPIC Hearing Healthcare ( a hearing-care provider), employees and employers each have a somewhat different take on the situation. Asked how many hours a day they believe their workplace is noisy, more than half (55 percent) of the employee respondents said it is noisy for more than one hour a day and more than one-third (36 percent) said it was noisy for more than three hours a day. In contrast, nearly 80 percent of employers said their workplace is hardly ever noisy.

The EPIC research also found nearly half of the employees felt the level of noise at work was damaging their hearing, even though less than one in four have had their hearing checked in the past two years.

In light of the above data and the impact hearing loss can have on productivity, employers shouldn’t be turning a deaf ear to this issue (excuse the pun). Indeed, they certainly have no shortage of tools available to them, ranging from reducing noise levels in their workplaces and providing employees with better protection to offering “financial support” through insurance products (EPIC’s business) and raising employee awareness.

Being this month is National Employee Wellness Month, I would think it might be as good a time as any for employers to revisit the state of their respective workplaces as far as noise exposure is concerned and the efforts that they’re taking to address the problem.

Will Employers Stop Offering Health Benefits?

Ezekiel Emanuel (an oncology doctor, professor of ethics at Penn and brother of Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel) was one of the architects of the Affordable Care Act — which, as we all know, mandates that employers with at least 50 full-time-equivalent employees provide health insurance. So it’s a bit surprising to learn that Emanuel has just written a new book in which he predicts that, as a result of the ACA, most employers in the United States will have stopped offering health benefits to their employees by 2025.

Why will companies stop offering health benefits? Because, Emanuel argues in the book — Reinventing American Health Care: How the Affordable Care Act Will Improve Our Terribly Complex, Blatantly Unjust, Outrageously Expensive, Grossly Inefficient, Error Prone System (how’s that for a title?) — the online insurance exchanges will provide employers with a viable alternative for doing so. Now, after you’ve picked yourself up off the floor from laughing so hard at the idea of Healthcare.gov being described as a “viable alternative” (although many of its worst bugs appear to have been fixed), note that Emanuel does acknowledge the botched rollout of the federal online exchange and some of the state ones, yet he describes others (such as Connecticut’s state exchange) that are working well. If all of the exchanges are fixed to the point that consumers can obtain health insurance by spending only 30 minutes or so enrolling, he says, then companies will indeed have a viable alternative to the expense and administrative hassles of providing benefits and can instead simply give their employees money to go out and purchase benefits on their own. The ACA’s excise taxes on high-cost health plans scheduled for 2018 are yet another incentive to get out of the health-benefits game, says Emanuel.

Private exchanges, which are essentially a defined-contribution approach to health benefits, have certainly sparked a lot of interest among employers lately. As many as 33 percent of respondents said private health exchanges would be their preferred approach to managing health care in the next three to five years, up from 5 percent now, according to Aon Hewitt’s Health Care Survey of more than 1,230 employers covering in excess of 10 million employees (Aon happens to be one of the vendors that offers a private exchange; others include Towers Watson, Buck Consultants and many smaller vendors). Brian Poger, CEO of consulting firm Benefitter, said at the just-concluded Health & Benefits Leadership Conference in Las Vegas that for many employees — especially low-wage workers with families – the health coverage available on public exchanges might be a better deal than that provided by their employers, considering that many have cut back or eliminated coverage for spouses and families.

Jettisoning traditional health benefits has yet to become a major trend among U.S. employers: Accenture estimated that 1 million employees enrolled in private exchanges last year, a tiny percentage of the nation’s workforce (although it also estimated that number could grow to 40 million by 2018). There is also the risk that employees on private exchanges will “buy down” — that is, purchase less-costly plans that may ultimately leave them with less coverage and worse health outcomes than traditional health plans, which tend to have “marginal” price differences, Mike Thompson, healthcare practice leader at PwC, told me last year. Companies that switch to private exchanges may also risk breaking the linkage between benefits and wellness, he said.

The expression “paradigm shift” is an overused cliché, but it’s clear we’re in one now when it comes to health benefits. Rest assured we’ll continue to cover this area closely.

Innovation Central

One of the most dynamic sessions at this year’s Health & Benefits Leadership Conference was the “Ideas and Innovators” session, in which experts from a variety of fields give five-minute presentations summarizing their thoughts on what HR leaders should do differently with regard to benefits.

Here’s a sampling of what some of them had to say: Lindsey Pollak, a millennial workplace expert and spokeswoman for The Hartford insurance company, called on companies to encourage mentoring between baby boomers and millennials. “Ninety percent of the millennials we surveyed said they appreciated guidance from boomers,” she said. “Millennials are digital natives, so they can mentor boomers in the use of technology.”

Millennials want the ability to customize their benefits, she said: “Millennials weren’t given teddy bears as kids; they were taken to Build-a-Bear workshops — they’re used to having things tailored for them.”

The same Hartford survey found that 70 percent of millennials consider themselves leaders, whether in their families, workplaces and communities. Companies can harness this leadership spirit for health and wellness, said Pollak — yet must keep in mind that millennials have also proven to be slow to sign up for benefits such as disability insurance. “Millennials aren’t taking advantage of these benefits — you must reach them on this.”

Brian Poger, founder and CEO of consulting firm Benefitter, urged employers to consider getting out of the business of providing health benefits (perhaps an odd thing to hear at a conference devoted to employee benefits). “Most employee raises are being absorbed by rising healthcare costs,” he said. “Why not offer cash instead of health benefits?”

Poger cited a McKinsey survey that found 85 percent of employees would stay with their employer even if they stopped offering health benefits. Many employers are charging signficantly higher premiums for spousal and family coverage or dropping it altogether, he said, which can be a major hardship for families earning the U.S. median household income of $51,000 a year. “Giving employees cash to purchase a family policy on the exchanges may be a better deal for them,” he said.

Lexie Dendrinelis, health promotion and wellness leader at manufacturing firm Barry-Wehmiller Cos., discussed how her company has made leadership and culture — rather than exercise and eating well — the centerpiece of health and wellness. “People can’t focus on their personal health if they’re stressed out about an unsafe workplace,” she said. “Building trustworthy leaders and cultures is the best intervention.”

At Barry-Wehmiller, the company has committed to building a “caring culture” where “we are committed to sending our friends home safe, well and fulfilled.” The company uses incentives and rewards to highlight positive behaviors and takes a “holistic approach” to caring for its employees and families, said Dendrinelis. “We are looking at creating a thriving culture that will bring down healthcare costs.”

 

Making Retirement Work

Retirement benefits and how to make them work — as in, you know, actually enabling employees to retire — was the subject of a spirited panel discussion at the second day of the Health & Benefits Leadership Conference in Las Vegas.

“Every day for the next 15 years, 10,000 people will reach retirement age,” said moderator Melissa Kahn, principal at benefits-consulting firm MJKAHN Associates. “This is the year that the last of the baby boomers will be turning 50. People are living longer and staying healthy longer and they’ll also be working longer.”

Many of these employees are concerned about retiring without enough funds to see them through old age, she said.

Panelist Greg Long, executive director of the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board, which administers the federal government’s 401(k) plan for federal employees (which has assets of $400 billion), talked about a step his agency took: It created an online tool that shows plan participants the monthly amount they would receive from an annuity based on their current plan balances. “You want them to focus on that monthly number, not the number that represents their account balances,” he said. This proved to be an excellent way to get participants focused on saving more and planning more for their retirement, said Long.

Laurie Rowley, co-founder and president of The National Association of Retirement Plan Participants, a nonprofit dedicated to financial education for the nation’s 75 million defined-contribution plan participants, discussed a comprehensive study her organization undertook to understand what drives plan-participant behavior. The biggest single impact on participants’ deferral rates, they found, was the company match. Financial literacy and the confidence participants have that they can actually acquire sufficient resources to retire comfortably were also key drivers, she said.

Trust was also an issue, said Rowley, with only 26 percent of study respondents saying they felt they could trust their DC plan’s recordkeeper.

Financial literacy has a fundamental impact on plan participant behavior, she said, including their deferral rates. Many people don’t understand the terminology related to financial planning and retirement.

“Financial literacy across all demograhpic groups is very low, and that impacts their confidence,” said Rowley. “We need to create personalized education that’s tailored around people’s financial needs. If you can inform them in a proactive way, that will really engage them.”

NARPP has created “just-in-time” educational materials that employers can provide to their workers as they’re making major financial decisions related to retirement planning, she says, adding that this material is available for employers to link to their own websites. Online education can also be valuable because some employees may be reluctant to let on how little they know about retirement and financial planning in front of their peers in a traditional classroom setting, said Rowley.

Catherine Golladay, vice president of participant services at Charles Schwab, said her firm has retrained its call-center staff to take a more “consultative” vs. transactional role with plan participants, using events such as an employee who calls in to make a hardship withdrawal from his 401(k) to discuss things like setting up an emergency savings fund and re-examining his investment strategy to generate higher returns.

“Our call centers have been trained to take a more conversational approach to interactions, with the goal of getting plan participants to think about whether their decisions make sense in the context of their financial lives,” she said.

Rowley said many employers that have set up auto-enrollment programs have cut back on financial education for their employees — and that’s a mistake.

“Our study shows that people who are auto-enrolled tend not to value their plans as much and are less financially literate,” she said. “But many plan sponsors have decided to roll back financial education in light of auto enrollment. That’s not right — many people still aren’t investing enough, and they still need education.”

Lessons from a Trusted Source

Consumer Reports has been a trusted source of information for folks in the market for a new car, a toaster oven or a snowblower. So why not healthcare?

I could be mistaken, but as a long-time subscriber, I’ve been noticing an increasing number of healthcare-related articles in Consumer Reports as of late. Articles86507521 like “Six Last-Minute Health Insurance Buying Tips” and “Six Tips for The Last Month of 2014 Health Care Open Enrollment.” But as Tara Montgomery made quite clear in her March 18 keynote during HRE‘s Health & Benefits Leadership Conference at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, CR‘s commitment to healthcare these days goes well beyond an article here or there.

In its very first issue, Montgomery pointed out, CR covered healthcare, with a story on Alka Seltzer and whether it lived up to all of its claims.

But it wasn’t until around 2003, she explained, that CR expanded its efforts in the healthcare arena. Then, five or six years ago, she said, CR really stepped up its efforts as quality data started to emerge.

Montgomery, who is senior director of health partnerships and impact at CR, walked attendees through the multitude of products CR offers, and the partnerships it’s engaged in, that are aimed at informing consumers and giving them tools for making better decisions. (HRE also recently interviewed Montgomery, if you’d like to read more.)

Leveraging the trust inherent in the CR brand, Montgomery said, “We want to teach consumers how they can become better shoppers for healthcare.”

Near the end of her presentation, Montgomery offered attendees some of the lessons CR has learned along the way, including:

  • How valued its brand is to employees. “There’s a lot to be said for using a trusted messenger in this alienating healthcare system,” she explained.
  • There are a lot of good, positive stories that can be told regarding health and well-being, and people who have taken responsibility for their health.
  • You have to “push” your messages, because people are not out there seeking this kind of information, just yet.
  • When you put the right tools at the point of decision-making, good things happen.
  • Personalize what you do.  “One size fits all is not very helpful,” she said. “Don’t talk to everyone at once, but segment your audience.”
  • Use entertainment and humor in your communications. The organization is able to take advantage of its team of journalists, who are talented storytellers—and that is much better than sending out official documents.
  • Put safety first, which almost always results in cost-savings, too.
  • Write your materials at the 7th grade level. CR‘s research has found that even consumers with a high literacy level are extremely comfortable with communications at that level and didn’t feel the material was dumbing down to them. (Also, don’t make it text heavy and use graphics.)
  • It’s OK to incorporate games, but make sure that they’re truly helpful and not just gimmicky.
  • Make sure your messages have cultural relevance. “Don’t just show generic individuals sitting in the doctor’s office,” she said.