Taking Talent Acquisition Up a Notch

If you’re looking for additional proof that talent-acquisition capability matters, check out the latest research coming from the Bersin by Deloitte unit of Deloitte Consulting LLP.

452269237According to Bersin by Deloitte’s study of 300 U.S. organizations, titled High-Impact Talent Acquisition: Key Findings and Maturity Model,  employers with mature talent-acquisition strategies perform, on average, 30 percent better than their peers as far as business outcomes are concerned, including the ability to meet or exceed customer expectations, create new products and services faster than competitors, and meet or exceed financial targets.

So what are the key drivers of talent-acquisition performance?

The Bersin by Deloitte research puts developing strong relationships between recruiters and hiring managers at the top of the list. At organizations with lower levels of maturity, the study found, recruiters are basically order takers for hiring managers. But for those organizations with higher levels of maturity, the relationships between recruiters and hiring managers typically were strong and, in turn, the performance outcomes greater.

Other influential talent-acquisition drivers, according to the research, include developing candidate pools, giving employers the ability to find “just-in-time” candidates; and leveraging social media both as a recruiting vehicle and as a way to promote the employer brand.

On this latter front, some mature organizations have gone so far as to hire dedicated strategists whose purpose is to “curate” social-media content.

When I asked Robin Erickson, vice president of talent-acquisition research at Bersin by Deloitte, what surprised her most in the findings, she pointed to the significant role building strong relationships plays as a driver of talent-acquisition performance. “We didn’t expect the relationship with hiring managers to be four times more influential than everything else—more influential than social media and more influential than employment branding,” she told me.

To be sure, there are no shortage of vendors out there working hard at developing tools aimed at helping employers get their hands around the three major drivers cited in this research. If you’re planning to attend next month’s HR Tech Conference in Las Vegas and walk the floor of the expo, I’m sure you’ll come across lots. But whether you’ll be there or not (and I certainly hope you will), I’ll be sure to keep my eyes open and let you know what I find.

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New ADP Index to Focus on ‘Vitality’

ADPPayroll-services provider ADP, which currently puts out a monthly employment report based on its massive trove of payroll data, announced today that it plans to start providing a quarterly workforce index that will offer “deep insights into U.S. workforce dynamics. The first index will be released next month, says ADP. Data from the new index will form the basis of a high-level panel discussion at the HR Tech Conference on October 9 in Las Vegas. David Gergen, senior political analyst for CNN, will chair a panel entitled “Workforce 2020: How Data and Analytics Will Shape the Workplace” that will discuss the implications of data analysis and the workforce from an economic, academic and talent management perspective.

“The U.S. labor market is as dynamic and complex as it has ever been, and this new index will help uncover key factors driving workforce trends,” said ADP president and CEO Carlos Rodriguez in a statement. “The index will provide a clearer picture of the vitality of today’s workforce.”

The new index is intended to answer “critical questions” about the state of the U.S. workforce, according to ADP, such as: How is the workforce thriving as a whole? How do major regions and large states compare? Which industries are doing well? What are the wage trends? What roles do age and gender play?

The index will measure quarterly changes in metrics such as employment growth, wage growth, job turnover and hours worked, says ADP. The index will be compiled by the company’s ADP Research Institute, which also puts out the monthly employment report, and will be derived from its warehouse of 24 million aggregated payroll data sets from companies of all sizes. ADP will collaborate with Moody’s Analytics Inc. on the quarterly report.

 

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Men, Women, Competition and Cooperation

Common stereotypes may tell us that men are more competitive and women are more cooperative, but researchers at Aalto University in Finland recently studied the physiological responses to both competitive and cooperative play in order to investigate respondents’ emotions to see how males and females are motivated to behave in these situations.

So, what did the researchers find?

While males did enjoy competition more than cooperation, females enjoyed both competition and cooperation equally.

(The results of the research were published in an article in the international science journal PLOS ONE.)

“Although there is a lot of research on gender differences, nobody has studied the emotions – the physiological mechanism that steers our behavior – of competitive and cooperative activities in males and females before. This gives a better insight into why people behave the way they do. You may unconsciously give false information about your motivations, but your body doesn’t lie,” said researcher Matias Kivikangas.

Kivikangas also said the results suggest that parts of the common stereotypes are untrue, at least in that women are not enjoying cooperation any more than competition.

And, he added, “it seems that the fact that men do enjoy competition more than cooperation might actually be a consequence from gender expectations rather than innate differences.”

According to the press release announcing the findings, the two studies employed cooperative and competitive digital games to test the responses. While this makes the responses more natural than a contrived experimental procedure, the intrinsically motivated nature of the activity limits the generalizability of the results.

‘Neither males or females experienced notable differences in negative emotions, indicating that only positive emotions are relevant in motivating competitive behavior. However, separate studies with other activities should be carried out as well, because I’d suspect that competition that the individual has not chosen themselves might elicit different emotional reactions’, Kivikangas added.

The implications of this study could indeed have some far-reaching  consequences in the workplace, especially in terms of how work groups are organized (i.e. competition-based vs. collaboration-based).

But for this admittedly male writer, the findings only confirm what I already learned from my childhood experiences playing (and losing) board games with my mom and sister: Women can be just as competitive — if not moreseo than — men.

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Intuition vs. Analytics

executive thinkingFor all the talk about data and analytics driving big business decisions, it seems most executives still rely primarily on their guts (and the guts of those around them) when it comes to crunch time.

That’s according to a new survey report by the Economist Intelligence Unit, sponsored by PwC, which found 58 percent of 1,135 senior executives from around the world saying that intuition or experience, and the advice and experience of others, were their decision-making modes of choice.

In addition, the study saw 94 percent of respondents saying management is prepared to make significant decisions about the strategic direction of the business, but just one third said they relied mainly on data and analytics in making their last big decision. (Incidentally, the 43 percent of executives who said their companies are highly data-driven also reported the biggest improvements in decision making over the last two years.)

All of this isn’t to say that leadership is completely dismissive of data and analytics as decision-making tools, of course.

“While executives say they continue to rely on experience, advice or their own gut instinct, they also see investment in data and analytics as critical to success,” says Dan DiFilippo, global and U.S. data and analytics leader at PwC, in a statement. “The challenge is how to marry the two.”

Nearly two-thirds of survey respondents indicated their companies are taking on that challenge, with 63 percent saying the use of data has already changed how their company makes decisions, and will likely have an even greater impact in the future.

The top three adjustments senior executives anticipate making in terms of their organizations’ approach to decisions include evaluating the number of people involved in making a decision, relying more on specialized and enhanced analytics and data analysis, and using dedicated data teams to inform strategic decisions.

“Experience and intuition and the use of data and analytics are not mutually exclusive,” says DiFilippo. “Executives know the right questions to ask. Now they need to know how to get the right answers from external and internal data they’ve used over the last two years.”

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Dangers of Social-Media Discipline

judge's gaveEmployers should be concerned by the National Labor Relations Board’s latest decision pertaining to social media and work. If not concerned, then taking very special note of, at the very least.

This ruling, as detailed thoroughly in this posting from Littler Publications, centers around employees’ off-duty social-media posts about work, and what employers can and can’t mandate about that.

In the ruling, as the posting puts it, the board came down hard on the employer — Triple Play (a.k.a., Triple D) Sports Bar and Grille in Watertown, Conn. — in that it “set a high bar for employers before they can terminate employees based on speech otherwise protected by Section 7 [of the National Labor Relations Act], determined that [a Facebook] ‘Like’ in that case was protected, reversed the employee’s firing and found a key provision in the employer’s social-media policy to be unlawfully overbroad.” I’d say that’s coming down hard.

The case has to do with several employees who were complaining in a Facebook discussion about a mistake they suspected the bar’s owners of making when calculating their state tax withholding. Some in the discussion were simply following the lines of the conversation. Here is Littler’s rendition of what transpired:

The owners organized a staff meeting with the payroll provider to discuss the issue. Before this meeting, Jamie LaFrance, a former employee who had recently left [her job] started a Facebook conversation by posting the following status update:

“Maybe someone should do the owners of Triple Play a favor and buy it from them. They can’t even do the tax paperwork correctly!!! Now I OWE money…Wtf!!!!”

Several comments followed in which a customer and a current employee sympathized.

LaFrance continued by accusing the owners of making a mistake in calculating tax withholdings, and she expressed her intention to report the mistake to the state’s “labor board.” At that point, a current employee, Vincent Spinella, selected the “Like” option under LaFrance’s initial status update.

As the Facebook exchange continued, LaFrance verbally attacked one of the owners:

“Hahahaha he’s such a shady little man. He prolly [sic] pocketed it all from all our paychecks.”

Another current employee, Jillian Sanzone, followed this statement by posting: “I owe too. Such an asshole.”  More comments followed, including a statement by another current employee that she planned to discuss the tax issue at a staff meeting.

After learning about the Facebook exchange from one of LaFrance’s Facebook friends, a current employee who happened to be the sister of one of the owners, the owners questioned Spinella about his “Like.”  They told Spinella that it was “apparent” he wanted to work somewhere else because he had “liked the disparaging and defamatory comments” and terminated his employment.

Spinella accused Triple D of illegal actions under the NLRA and the case came before the NLRB. Triple D argued that the disparaging comments and Spinella’s “Like” took the case outside the realm of the NLRA’s Section 7 protection as a concerted activity. The board, however, ruled otherwise because: Spinella did not specifically “like” any of LaFrance’s allegedly defamatory comments in and of themselves, the comments weren’t intended for public consumption on a private Facebook page and no one mentioned anything disparaging about the employer, per se, but related everything to an ongoing labor — i.e., tax withholding — dispute.

The NLRB also ruled this portion of Triple D’s social-media policy was too broad:

“[W]hen Internet blogging, chat room discussions … or other forms of communication extend to employees … engaging in inappropriate discussions about the company, management, and/or co-workers, the employee may be violating the law and is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment.  … In the event state or federal law precludes this policy, then it is of no force or effect.”

So what should you be concerned about exactly? Littler attorneys Philip Gordon and Zoe Argento offer these six takeaways in their post:

  1. Because a “Like” standing alone can be protected, employers should consider consulting with counsel before disciplining employees based on their selection of the “Like” button.
  2. When analyzing whether a “Like” is protected speech, employers should refer to the specific post or comment to which the “Like” relates.
  3. When analyzing whether otherwise protected social-media posts have crossed the line and lost their protection, the NLRB will apply different standards to disparagement of the employer’s products and services and defamation of the employer or members of its workforce.
  4. The actual malice standard applicable to defamatory statements imposes a heavy burden on the employer to prove that the employee posted content knowing it was false or it was made with reckless disregard for the truth.
  5. Employers should consult with counsel before firing an employee for allegedly defamatory or disparaging speech when that speech takes place in the context of a group discussion in social media.
  6. The NLRB continues to closely scrutinize social-media policies. Employers should recognize that language which is general or establishes subjective standards, such as “inappropriate discussion,” will raise a red flag for the board unless accompanied by examples that make it clear to a reasonable employee that the general language is not intended to encompass protected speech.  Relatedly, employers should expect the board to closely scrutinize any disclaimer before relying on it to “save” policy language from invalidation.  Such disclaimers have not been very helpful overall in terms of avoiding NLRB problems.

For your additional reading pleasure, and pointers, here are numerous blog posts we’ve written about social media in the workplace and social-media policies employers are drafting, should be drafting and shouldn’t be drafting in their attempts to control its impact.

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Drug Testing Index Reverses Direction

Most employers may have zero tolerance when it comes to drugs in the workplace, but if we’re to believe the latest data from Quest Diagnostics in Madison, N.J., fewer job candidates and workers are taking such policies to heart these days.

200273910-001For the first time in more than a decade, the percentage of positive drug tests among American workers in Quest Diagnostics’ Drug Testing Index increased, climbing to 3.7 percent in 2013 from 3.5 percent in 2012 (based on 7.6 million urine drug tests), according to Quest. The increase was fueled primarily by a rise in positive tests for marijuana and amphetamines.

As you might expect, the two states that have passed recreational-use marijuana laws—Colorado and Washington—experienced the greatest jump in marijuana-positivity rates, climbing 20 percent and 23 percent between 2012 and 2013, respectively. For the general workforce in all 50 states, the increase averaged 5 percent.

But it should also be noted that those two states experienced dramatic increases in marijuana-positivity rates prior to legalization at the end of 2012. From 2009 to 2010, Colorado experienced a 22-percent increase and Washington a 10-percent decline in positivity. From 2011 to 2012, Colorado experienced a 3-percent increase and Washington an 8-percent increase in positivity.

Barry Sample, director of science and technology for Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions, says he’s not sure why the steep increases and declines in those two states preceded the legalization of marijuana. “It is possible that relaxed societal views of marijuana use in those two states, relative to others, may, in part, be responsible for the recent increase in positivity rates,” he says. “Yet this doesn’t explain why both states also experienced steep rises—and declines—in positivity in recent years.”

In light of these findings, Quest says it will be paying close attention to how the data evolves over the next year or two.

But what “we do know,” he adds, “is that workforce positivity for marijuana is definitely on the rise across the United States.”

In addition to these findings, Quest reports that use of amphetamines showed an increase across all three specimen types and oxycodone positivity declined 8.3 percent between 2013 and 2012 and 12.7 percent between 2012 and 2011 in the combined U.S. workforce. (In fact, four states actually experienced double-digit declines in oxycodone-positivity rates in both 2013 and 2012: Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Ohio.)

Of course, the rise in positivity rates could be aberration. After all, it’s just one year — and hardly the kind of move employers need to get worked up about. But that said, it’s still something they’re probably going to want to keep a close eye on, especially if more states decide to follow in the footsteps of Colorado and Washington and pass laws legalizing the recreational use of marijuana.

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Employees: Pay Matters Most

payWe routinely feature, in our print edition and on our website, stories about the vital role played by leadership training, wellness programs, communication strategies and even office design in creating and sustaining employee engagement. But it shouldn’t obscure the fact that, for most employees, the bottom line is the bottom line — when it comes to engagement, pay is the most important factor.

The new Workforce 2020 survey, which queried more than 5,400 employees and executives in 27 countries and was conducted by Oxford Economics with the support of SAP, is the latest report to confirm this. The survey finds that two-thirds of the respondents cite competitive compensation as the most important attribute of a job. And it’s cross-generational: millennials and non-millennials alike cite comp as the most-important benefit, while 41 percent of millennials and 38 percent of non-millennials say higher compensation would increase their loyalty and engagement with the company.

This isn’t to undermine the importance of things like manager training and corporate culture: Studies have repeatedly shown that while competitive pay and benefits can lure employees to companies, having a positive work environment and a good boss play crucial roles in keeping them there. But if they feel under-compensated for the value they provide, it’s only a matter of time before greener pastures — or at least, the appearance of greener pastures — lure them elsewhere.

Do companies get this? The trucking industry doesn’t appear to. According to HREOnline columnist and Wharton School Professor Peter Cappelli, real wages for truck drivers apparently have fallen by almost 10 percent during the last 10 years — and even a critical shortage of truck drivers so severe that some trucking companies are unable to accommodate their customers’ needs hasn’t led to an increase in wages. Companies cite customers’ unwillingness to pay higher fees as a reason for not raising wages, Cappelli writes — and yet, trucking firms are perfectly willing to pass along higher fuel costs to their customers, he adds.

Cappelli ends his column on this provocative note: The trucking industry will either have to raise wages to attract the drivers it needs, or “we start hearing that we need to import more foreign drivers because ‘no Americans want to drive trucks.’ “

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You Can Keep the Corner Office

AA049404HR leaders are always on the lookout for the organization’s next generation of leaders. A new survey, however, finds the majority of workers aren’t particularly interested in ever taking the reins.

A recent poll of 3,625 workers age 18 and up, conducted by Harris on behalf of CareerBuilder, found just one-third (34 percent) of these employees aspire to leadership positions. Just 7 percent indicated an interest in shooting for senior- or C-level management.

Why are these workers indifferent toward reaching the top levels of the organization? Most (52 percent) said they are simply satisfied in their current positions. Another 34 percent of this group indicated they don’t want to sacrifice work/life balance at the expense of advancement, while 17 percent said they don’t have the necessary education.

The survey did find the desire for leadership roles to be greater among men than women, by an 11 percent margin (40 percent versus 29 percent). At 44 percent and 39 percent, respectively, African-Americans and LGBT workers were more likely to take aim at leadership positions than the national average. Thirty-two percent of workers with disabilities reported similar aspirations, as did 35 percent of Hispanics.

The poll also addressed the glass-ceiling issue, asking respondents to what extent they felt firms held female and minorities back in their career pursuits. Overall, 20 percent of those surveyed said they feel his or her organization has a glass ceiling preventing women and minorities from reaching higher job levels. Just 9 percent of non-diverse males said they think a glass ceiling is in place at their companies.

These figures spiked, however, among those with designs on management and senior management positions. For example, 33 percent of females in this category felt such barriers existed, while 34 percent of Hispanics, 50 percent of African-Americans and 59 percent of workers with disabilities said the same. Twenty-one percent of LGBT workers seeking leadership roles indicated as much, slightly less than the national average.

While it seems many employees are content to forego the executive career track, “it is important … to promote a culture of meritocracy in which all workers, regardless of gender, race or sexual orientation, are able to reach senior-level roles based on their skills and past contributions alone,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder, in a statement. “The survey found that employees at companies that have initiatives to support aspiring female and minority leaders are far less likely to say a glass ceiling holds individuals back.”

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Exec Hiring Market Heating Up

Heading into 2015, almost two-thirds of employers are selectively or significantly increasing executive hiring levels, and a similar percentage of employed executives are now open to or actively pursuing new opportunities, according to a newly released survey focused solely on the executive market.

The results of the Greenwich, Conn.-based Claymore Group’s Labor Day 2014 Executive Talent Market survey were culled from the responses of 407 executives.

The executive respondents indicated that the industries they work in that are planning to hire the most in 2015 are:

* Consulting/Professional services,

* Healthcare/Pharm,

* Health insurance, and

* Wealth management.

Executives responding to the survey also indicated that the strongest functional areas demonstrating growth in executive hiring for 2015 are in are in sales, consulting/professional services, product management, risk management/compliance, and IT.

About two thirds of currently employed executives are now open to or actively exploring new opportunities. The best sources for executive employment were indicated to be Networking/Referrals and LinkedIn by both employed and unemployed executives. Facebook and job boards were viewed as the worst sources with internal, retained and contingency recruiters being viewed as good sources.

HR executives increasingly need to recognize the growth in executive hiring and demand by responding more rapidly in making offers as well as in making more competitive offers to attract the top executive talent as they are clearly more in demand, says Managing Director Steven Landberg.

“They also need to recognize a growing need to seek to retain their top executive talent as they will certainly be increasingly sought after by others in the talent market.”

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Could Gen Zers Help Solve STEM Skills Gap?

461252089 -- young scientistMore good news for employers when it comes to Gen Zers, the next generation — those now in high school and college — soon to enter the workforce en masse.

This just-released report from Chicago-based CareerBuilder says high-school seniors’ future career plans could very well clean up — or at least help bridge — that highly troublesome science, technology, engineering and math skills gap said to be barreling down the tracks.

According to the report, new research conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder and its subsidiary, Moscow, Idaho-based Economic Modeling Specialists International, shows nearly three in four of 209 high-school seniors polled already know what career they want to pursue, and STEM-related fields top their choices. (The survey queried 2,188 hiring and human resource managers, ages 18 and over, as well.)

The poll also finds the majority (97 percent) of high-school seniors plan to go to college to obtain a two-year or four-year degree or other training that may ultimately help close the talent gap. The most popular majors? You got it, mostly STEM-related. Here they are:

  1. Engineering
  2. Business
  3. Psychology
  4. Biological and Biomedical Sciences
  5. Physical Sciences
  6. Arts, Visual and Performing
  7. Computer and Information Sciences
  8. Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences
  9. English Language and Literature
  10. Math and Statistics

And here are the most popular choices for profession among the 73 percent of high-school seniors who know what they want to pursue (again, STEM-heavy):

  • Teacher
  • Engineer
  • Psychologist/Psychiatrist
  • Scientist – Biological/Physical/Social
  • Artist/Designer
  • Veterinarian
  • Machine Operator
  • Computer Programmer
  • Physician
  • Government Professional
  • Nurse

This seems to work quite nicely alongside a news analysis I posted on HREOnline on Tuesday, the same day the first truly definitive study on Gen Zers was released by Millennial Branding, based in New York, and Randstad, with U.S. headquarters in Atlanta.

That study, Gen Y and Gen Z Workplace Expectations, shows Gen Zers are more rooted in prudent and pragmatic notions about how work gets done and what is needed to succeed than their Gen Y predecessors (ages 21 to 32).

“Gen Zers … appear to be more realistic instead of optimistic, are likely to be more career-minded, and can quickly adapt to new technology to work more effectively,” Dan Schawbel, founder of Millennial Branding and author of Promote Yourself, told me for that piece.

They’ve also seen how much their parents and Gen Yers have struggled in the recession, he said, so “they come to the workplace well-prepared, less entitled and more equipped to succeed.”

Basically, Schawbel told me, they’re willing to work harder toward goals and have fewer illusions about what it takes to achieve them.

As the daughter, granddaughter and mother of scientists and engineers, I’ve lived through the hard work, stamina and — yes — realism involved in and needed for such pursuits.

So I have to say, I foresee only good things when you put these two reports together.

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