Another Coffin Nail for EEOC Merger?

After taking office in January, one of President Trump’s first orders of business was to act on a recommendation from the conservative Heritage Foundation, which recommended eliminating redundancies in the Labor Department’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Indeed, in the president’s budget, the OFCCP saw its budget reduced from $105 million to approximately $88 million while EEOC funding in Trump’s budget proposal essentially stayed the same at roughly $364 million, according to Federal News Radio.

Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta even testified at a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing in support of the Trump proposal, where he called the merger a “commonsense change” that “combines two civil rights agencies that already work together closely.”

But opposition to the plan has been widespread ever since it was announced, according to that report. It notes that 73 civil rights groups condemned the measure, and even the U.S. Chamber of Commerce has lined up against it:

Camille Olson, chair of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s equal employment opportunity policy subcommittee, told lawmakers recently that numerous companies have contacted the Chamber with concerns about merging the agencies. “Both the EEOC and the OFCCP need reforms,” she said, but not in the form of a merger.

Signs of resistance to the merger idea are also becoming more evident in Congress, where last week the U.S. House of Representatives approved an amendment that would prohibit funds from being used to merge the EEOC and the Labor Department’s contractor compliance office, according to a Bloomberg BNA report.

The proposal to merge the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the DOL’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs is “a total mess,” said Rep. Donny Scott (D-Va.), the ranking member of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce who offered the amendment.

“Both have important missions, but combining them would be total confusion,” Scott told Bloomberg BNA. “The Chamber of Commerce opposed the merger, civil rights groups opposed the merger, and the Senate already had language in their bill taking away the merger, so I think it was appropriate in the House bill to also make a statement.”

The Bloomberg report notes that “the House amendment follows the Senate Appropriations Committee’s rejection last week of the proposed merger, which can’t occur without lawmaker support. A number of legislative and regulatory actions would be required to consolidate the agencies and to reconcile their different enforcement structures and approaches.”