Diversity Memo Causes a Stir

The tech world is chattering today about a widely circulated internal memo from a male software engineer unhappy with Google’s diversity practices.

Posted in full over the weekend by tech-oriented websites Motherboard and Gizmodo, the memo argues that innate biological differences between men and women account for underrepresentation of women in the upper reaches of the industry.

“I’m simply stating that the distribution of preferences and abilities of men and women differ, in part due to biological causes, and that these differences may explain why we don’t see equal representation of women in tech and leadership,” the memo reads.

The engineer also argues that Google’s diversity practices amount to a politically liberal orthodoxy “that can irreparably harm Google.”

In response to the memo, which drew a harsh response from some Googlers on Twitter, the company’s vice president of diversity, integrity and governance offered a memo of her own. Danielle Brown had been on the job just a few weeks when the controversy erupted.

“Diversity and inclusion are a fundamental part of our values and the culture we continue to cultivate,” she writes. “We are unequivocal in our belief that diversity and inclusion are critical to our success as a company, and we’ll continue to stand for that and be committed to it for the long haul.”

Addressing the complaint about what the engineer perceived to be a pervasive liberal ideology at Google, Brown writes: “Part of building an open, inclusive environment means fostering a culture in which those with alternative views, including different political views, feel safe sharing their opinions. But that discourse needs to work alongside the principles of equal employment found in our Code of Conduct, policies, and anti-discrimination laws.”

(By Tuesday, word emerged that Google had fired the engineer for violating its code of conduct.)

Leave a Reply