The State of Independence

The “gig economy” may be the future, but growth in the number of independent workers is slowing as the nation’s robust job market lures some back to traditional employment, a new report concludes.

MBO Partners, a Virginia-based firm that offers a technology platform for self-employed professionals, each year tallies the number of independent workers. Its 2017 State of Independence in America, seventh in an annual series of reports, finds the total number of such workers edged up just 3 percent to 40.9 million since 2016.

Most of that growth was in what the authors call “occasional” independent workers — including people with regular jobs who pursue a freelance “side gig” at least once a month. The number of these workers soared 23 percent in one year to 12.9 million, the report finds.

By contrast, the number of full-time independent workers — those working for themselves at least 15 hours a week — dropped more than 4 percent to 16.2 million. This is the second straight year of decline for this group, study’s authors say. “Surveys tell us … that many people prefer the security of full-time jobs,” they note. “We expect the number of full-time independents to cycle up and down in response to the strength of the jobs market.”

Predictably, part-time independent workers — those working for themselves fewer than 15 hours a week but devoting more time than an “occasional” independent  — fell in the middle: Their numbers declined only slightly, by 3 percent, to 11.8 million.