House Passes Comp Time Bill

Hourly workers who’ve had to juggle shift schedules with picking up their kids from school or daycare or attending college classes while holding down a full-time job may have cause to cheer a bill that was passed earlier this week by the U.S. House of Representatives. The Working Families Flexibility Act, sponsored by U.S. Rep. Martha Roby (R.-Ala.), would allow employers to give their workers paid time off in lieu of time-and-a-half pay (i.e., “overtime pay”) when they work more than 40 hours during a single week. The bill  now heads to the Senate, where Sen. Mike Lee (R.-Utah) has introduced a similar measure.

The House bill, which had strong Republican support, was touted as a way to “codify” flexibility for employees.

“I don’t think there’s anything more powerful than giving them more control over their time so that they can make the best decisions for themselves and their families,” said Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R.-Wash.) at a press conference held by Republican House leaders, reports CNN.

House Democrats were universally opposed to the bill, giving it zero votes. Six House Republicans also voted against it. The bill’s chances of passing the Senate appear uncertain at best: It will need to garner votes from at least 8 Democrats  as well as all 52 Republican senators in order to avoid a filibuster and make it to the desk of President Trump, who’s indicated he will sign it.

“This is nothing but a recycled bad bill that would allow big corporations to make an end-run around giving workers the pay they’ve earned,” said Sen. Patty Murray (D.-Wash.) in a statement. Several similar bills have been passed by the House in recent years but died in the Senate.

The National Partnership for Women & Families has also strongly criticized the bill, saying that it would put too many restrictions on employees’ ability to decide when they’d want to use their paid time off.

If it became law, the Working Families Flexibility Act would give workers “a false and dangerous choice between overtime pay now and time off later when they work more than 40 hours in a week,” writes NPWF Vice President Vicki Shabo in The Hill. “It does this by giving employers the right to hold onto employees’ overtime wages for months, while giving employees no guarantee that they will be able to take their ‘comp time’ when they need it.”