Apple’s Latest Design Feat

Architectural firms are continuing to push the envelope as far as workplace design is concerned.

Last July, some of you may recall, I wrote about Amazon’s new corporate headquarters in downtown Seattle and the three giant transparent spheres, which serve as greenhouses for more than 3,000 species of plants. (The spheres, BTW, are slated to be open later this year.)

Well, now, joining the parade is Apple and Apple Park, the company’s 175-acre campus. Beginning in April, around 12,000 employees are scheduled to move to the new site over a six-month period.

As a recent Apple press release put it, “Apple Park is transforming miles of asphalt sprawl into a haven of green space in the heart of the Santa Clara Valley.”

The campus realizes Steve Jobs’ vision of creating a “home of innovation for generations to come,” according to Apple CEO Tim Cook. The workspaces and parklands, he says, are “designed to inspire our team as well as benefit the environment. We’ve achieved one of the most energy-efficient buildings in the world and the campus will run entirely on renewable energy.”

The intent is to create a wonderfully open environment for people to create, collaborate and work together, adds Apple Chief Design Officer Jony Ive.

As you might expect, the campus reflects Apple’s “intense focus” on design.

Apple Park, which was designed in collaboration with London-based Foster + Partners, includes a visitors center and cafe that will be open to the public, a 100,000-square-foot fitness center for Apple employees, two miles of walking and running paths for employees and the Steve Jobs Theater, which is slated to open later in the year.

To be sure, collaboration, innovation and environmental friendliness—the objectives that are included in Apple’s press release—lie at the heart of campuses like Apple Park. But, as a recent study conducted by Sodexo also reminds us, we’d be making a mistake were we to overlook the talent-acquisition and retention benefits of creating more alluring work environments.

The Sodexo study of 2,800 U.K. knowledge workers, titled “Creating a Workplace That Maximises Productivity,” found that 67 percent of those workers said they had left their last jobs because their workplaces were “not optimized for them” and 69 percent of them said  workplace design directly impacted their effectiveness.

I have to imagine that was in the backs of some folks’ minds at Apple, as well, as they worked to fulfill Steve Jobs’ vision.

End note: Don’t forget today is Employee Appreciation Day—so try not to behave like this CEO in the car (even if the recipient of his rant isn’t actually an employee)!