A Bad Day for Puzder and Unions

Andrew Puzder (photo by Gage Skidmore)

He’s outta there — Andrew Puzder is, at any rate, having withdrawn his name from consideration as President Donald Trump’s Secretary of Labor. Trump introduced today Alexander Acosta, dean of Florida International University College of Law and a former member of the National Labor Relations Board, as his new DOL nominee. Puzder’s nomination had been plagued by controversy from the start. Current and former employees of CKE Restaurants, where Puzder serves as CEO, accused him of vastly underpaying workers and denying them benefits at the company’s Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. fast-food chains and musing aloud that he wished he could replace them with robots. Matters were not helped by an investigation by Capital & Main that uncovered a widespread pattern of abuse, harassment and discrimination of and against CKE employees at the chain-store and corporate level. Six cases were filed against the company by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, “far more than any other large burger chain on a per-revenue basis, with the exception of Sonic Drive-In,” the website reported.

Puzder enjoyed strong support from many in the business community, as our story in December reported. However, Democrats were strongly against him. “Puzder’s disdain for the American worker, the very people he would be responsible for protecting, is second to none,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D.-N.Y., told CNN.

What really appeared to sink Puzder’s nomination, however, was the revelation that he’d employed an undocumented immigrant as a housekeeper and the allegations of brutal domestic abuse against his ex-wife (although she’s since denied that the abuse took place) that culminated in the release on Politico of an Oprah Winfrey episode that featured the ex-wife, Lisa Fierstein, in disguise describing details of the abuse she’d said she’d suffered. A number of Republican Senators informed the White House that they would no longer support Puzder, who announced his withdrawal yesterday afternoon.

Labor advocates cheered Puzder’s withdrawal, but they’re probably not happy about the closely-watched vote that took place yesterday at Boeing’s South Carolina plant, in which workers voted overwhelmingly against joining the International Association of Machinists union.  More than 2,000 of the 3,000 workers eligible to vote voted no, while only 700 voted in favor, CNN reports. Had the workers voted in favor of the union, it would have marked a big change in South Carolina, a right-to-work state with the lowest union membership rate of any state in the country, at 1.6 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The union had previously called for a vote at the plant in 2015 but canceled it amid doubts about worker support. Now it will have to wait for a year before calling for another election, per National Labor Relations Board rules.

Boeing had argued strongly against unionization, with management saying the union would call for costly strikes and was not needed. However, the IAM had argued during its campaign that workers at the South Carolina plant were paid wages that are 36 percent lower than their counterparts at Boeing’s heavily unionized plants in Washington state.

Boeing management expressed victory. “We will continue to move forward as one team,” Joan Robinson-Berry, vice president in charge of Boeing South Carolina, said in a statement.

In his own statement, IAM lead organizer Mike Evans said: “We’re disappointed the workers at Boeing South Carolina will not yet have the opportunity to see all the benefits that come with union representation.”