Facebook Boosts Bereavement Leave

In 2015, SurveyMonkey CEO Dave Goldberg died unexpectedly at the age of 47. On Tuesday, his wife — Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg — announced that the social networking giant will now give employees up to 20 days of paid bereavement leave in the event of an immediate family member’s death and up to 10 days for the death of an extended family member.

“People should be able both to work and be there for their families. No one should face this trade-off,” Sandberg wrote in a Facebook post announcing the new policy. “Amid the nightmare of Dave’s death when my kids needed me more than ever, I was grateful every day to work for a company that provides bereavement leave and flexibility. I needed both to start my recovery.”

Sandberg also announced that the company will offer up to six weeks of paid leave to care for a sick relative and three paid days for employees to care for a relative with a short-term illness, such as  a child with the flu.

Facebook’s generous bereavement policy puts it far ahead of most — if not all — U.S. employers. Although 80 percent of U.S. companies have bereavement policies, they offer an average of only four paid days of leave for the death of an immediate family member, according to the Society for Human Resource Management’s 2016 Paid Leave in the Workplace survey. There is no federal law requiring employers to give workers paid time off to grieve for the death of a loved one.

Obviously, most companies don’t have the financial resources of Facebook (which is also locked in an arms race with other well-funded Silicon Valley companies for tech talent) and probably won’t be emulating it anytime soon, if ever. But I hope that Sandberg’s announcement gets HR and other company leaders to seriously think about the support they currently offer to grieving employees and consider giving more. Here at HRE, we have several colleagues who’ve suffered the loss of a close family member within the last year and a half.  No amount of time off can make up for such a loss, but simply giving employees the support and the time necessary for attending to the so-called “business of death” — making funeral arrangements, resolving legal and financial issues, comforting other family members — means a lot.  And that often requires more than three or four days.