Gaming the Gainsharing System

This is just a guess, but I’m going to say the mood throughout Whole Foods break rooms is less than festive this holiday season.

And if the claims made in a new lawsuit prove to be true, you couldn’t really blame the grocery store chain’s employees for not getting into the spirit this year.

Last week, one current and one former employee from a Whole Foods store in Washington, D.C. filed a federal class-action lawsuit claiming the Austin, Texas-based company “engaged in a nationwide scheme to strip hard-working employees of earned bonuses in order to maximize [its] own profit.”

More specifically, plaintiffs Michael Molock and Randal Kuczor assert that a group of managers gamed Whole Foods’ gainsharing program to avoid paying automatic bonuses to departments that came in under budget for the year, as reported by the Washington Post.

According to the lawsuit, the gainsharing program is intended to enable employees in such departments to share in surpluses. The plaintiffs claim, however, that Whole Foods avoided paying by shifting labor costs to other departments without properly accounting for it, as well as by creating “fast teams” comprised of employees who float from one department to another.

The complaint also alleges that company executives knew of the “illicit practice of shifting costs,” which the suit says has impacted as many as 20,000 past and present Whole Foods employees.

In a statement, Whole Foods acknowledges that some sort of bonus program manipulation took place, while maintaining that it was confined to a relatively small number of its stores. Nevertheless, Whole Foods says it is investigating the matter. And, as the Post reports, the organization has already terminated the nine managers known to have been involved.

The plaintiffs are asking for more than to see a few managers fired. The suit seeks $200 million in punitive damages and triple unpaid wages, among other relief, according to the Post.

“Defendants intentionally manipulated the program and illicitly engaged in a nationwide corporate practice of ‘shifting labor costs’ in order to pad its profits,” the suit claims, alleging that this “unlawful” maneuvering effectively wiped out surpluses in certain departments, “thereby robbing hard-working employees of earned bonuses.”