The Zenefits Saga Continues

It appears Zenefits woes are continuing—and if the predictions of one consultant are correct, they aren’t likely to end anytime soon.

Yesterday, Washington State Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler ordered Zenefits to “cease free distribution of its employee benefits software, noting the tactic violates Washington state insurance law against inducements,” his office’s statement reads.zenefitslogo

Washington is said to be the first state to take action against the company for violating inducement laws. Under an agreement with Kreidler, Zenefits can challenge the order within 90 days.

The state took issue with the fact that Zenefits required clients to designate it as its broker of record and then collected insurance commissions from the products it sold in order for them to access its free software.

“The inducement law in Washington is clear,” Kreidler said. “Everyone has to play by the same rules.”

Following the announcement, Zenefits’ General Counsel Josh Stein posted the following on the company’s website

“Today, Zenefits has reached a compromise agreement with the Washington Office of the Insurance Commissioner (OIC) on how Zenefits will price its services in Washington State.  Beginning January 1, at the order of OIC, Zenefits may no longer provide free software services in Washington. As a result, Zenefits will charge all Washington state customers $5 per employee per month for our core HR product.”

Stein went on to say …

“The Washington viewpoint is a decidedly minority view. Since its founding, Zenefits has had conversations with regulators about our business model, which includes some free HR apps. Many states have looked into the issue and concluded that free software from Zenefits is not a problem; in fact, it’s in the interest of consumers. Only one state other than Washington has disagreed.  Utah’s department of insurance tried to force Zenefits to raise prices for consumers, and Utah’s state legislature and governor quickly took action, passing a bill to clarify that its rebating statute should not be interpreted to prohibit innovative new business models that deliver value to consumers.”

Earlier today, I spoke with Rhonda Marcucci, partner and consultant in Gruppo Marcucci, a Chicago-based HR and benefits technology consulting firm.

Zenefits has created its own regulatory scrutiny reputation for the rest of its life, Marcucci told me. In this case, she said, “I don’t think it is driven so much by the brokers but by the insurance departments who are extremely angry about the licensing piece—so that now invites more scrutiny in other places. Brokers may have brought it to [the attention of insurance regulators], but the way I look at this, Zenefits is a regulatory penalty box—and they will be, I think, forever.”

Marcucci noted that every state, except for California, has some kind of no rebating or inducement laws for transactions. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that every employer is following the law.

At the end of day, she said, states typically base their decision on enforcing these laws by “who screams the loudest.”

As far as Zenefits is concerned, Marcucci said, it’s realistic to expect that other states might follow Washington’s lead, especially those states with difficult regulatory insurance environments such as New York.