New Honors for Six Leaders in HR

The National Academy of Human Resources inducted its latest class of fellows Thursday night in New York City, honoring five high-profile HR leaders and scholars at the organization’s annual meeting.

2016 Fellows of the National Academy of HR, from left: Benito Cachinero-Sánchez, Mark Huselid, Mirian Graddick-Weir, Susan Schmitt.,Michael D’Ambrose, Boris Groysberg.
2016 fellows of the National Academy of HR, from left: Benito Cachinero-Sánchez, Mark Huselid, Mirian Graddick-Weir (distinguished fellow), Susan Schmitt, Boris Groysberg, Michael D’Ambrose.

The academy also elevated Mirian Graddick-Weir of Merck & Co. to the rank of distinguished fellow. First named a fellow in 2001, Graddick-Weir earned the latest honor for her record as “a true human-resources superstar,” said William J. Conaty, a former senior vice president of HR at General Electric who himself was named a distinguished fellow in 2007.

Graddick-Weir is executive vice president of human resources at the Kenilworth, N.J.-based  pharmaceutical giant, which employs 68,000 people in 90 countries. In 2006, she joined the company from a similar role at AT&T, where she held several posts over a 20-year career. With other honors that include being named Human Resource Executive® magazine’s HR Executive of the Year in 2000, she also holds a Ph.D. in industrial/organizational psychology from Pennsylvania State University.

In thanking members of the academy, Graddick-Weir called on HR leaders to recognize their role not only in helping employees and employers thrive, but in helping society tackle social challenges. Some of those challenges, she noted, are especially evident in the United States this year as the nation prepares to choose a president.

As HR professionals, “we have an incredible opportunity to play a leading role” in helping people grow professionally and succeed economically, Graddick-Weir said. She hailed companies that have invested in education and training, and those that have committed to addressing pay inequities and unconscious bias in hiring and promotion.

“What an exciting time it is to be a chief human resources officer,” Graddick-Weir said. “We have an enormous opportunity to … shape the workplace of the future.”

Also honored at the event, held at the Waldorf Astoria New York, was the academy’s 2016 class of fellows:

  • Benito Cachinero-Sánchez, senior vice president for human resources at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., a global chemical company based in Wilmington, Del. Before joining the firm in 2011, he held leading HR jobs at companies that include Lucent Technologies and Johnson & Johnson.
  • Michael D’Ambrose, senior vice president and CHRO of Archer Daniels Midland Co. He joined the Chicago-based agricultural giant in 2006 after top HR posts with First Data, Citibank and other companies.
  • Boris Groysberg, a professor at the Harvard Business School whose research focuses on management of human capital. He’s the author of three books, including Chasing Stars: The Myth of Talent and the Portability of Performance.
  • Mark Huselid, distinguished professor of workforce analytics at Northeastern University. His research focuses on the interplay of HR management systems, corporate strategy, workforce differentiation and firm performance. He is author or co-author of several books, including The Differentiated Workforce: Transforming Talent into Strategic Impact.
  • Susan Schmitt, senior vice president of human resources at Rockwell Automation. Before joining the Milwaukee, Wis.-based industrial-technology company nearly a decade ago, Schmitt held senior HR roles with Kellogg Co., the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and others.