What’s Driving Engagement

Engagement continues to be a hot topic. So I guess it’s no surprise to find at least two vendors at this year’s HR Tech Conference unveiling research studies on the topic.

thinkstockphotos-460766179For starters, Oracle released its first Global Engagement Study earlier this week.

According to feedback from 5,000 full-time employees at a variety of organizations, 40 percent of the respondents said their employers could do more to leverage technology to better enable them to do their jobs.

Employees as consumers are more plugged into technology than ever—so they expect the same level of accessibility at work that they get in their personal lives, says Gretchen Alarcon, group vice president of HCM product strategy at Oracle.

The research found that the quality of the digital working experience impacts how much employees feel they are empowered to do their job.

As you might expect, the research also revealed leadership can be a huge driver when it comes to engagement.

“One of things we learned is that leadership availability really matters,” says Alarcon. “Do employees have the ability to ask questions? Are they approachable? Do they feel trusted [by their leaders]? All of these can have a direct impact on engagement.”

The study, based on 4,706 interviews conducted earlier this year by Kantar TNS, found that 47 percent of the respondents consider their leaders visible and approachable and 44 percent have confidence in the company’s leadership, suggesting that plenty of room for improvement remains.

Meanwhile, Ultimate Software released the results of its 2016 National Study on Satisfaction at Work survey, a study of 1,000 American workers conducted this summer by The Center for Generational Kinetics. This study found that trust, open communication and development opportunities play an increasingly important role in influencing employee satisfaction and commitment. Indeed, these factors typically had equal or greater importance than compensation or financial motivators.

“What the research showed us was that the No. 1 driver of employee satisfaction is how companies treat their employees,” says Adam Rogers, chief technology officer of Ultimate. (Rogers shared some of the findings in an Ideas & Innovators presentation at the conference earlier today.)

Exactly three-quarters of the employees surveyed said they were more likely to stay with a company longer if their concerns were heard and addressed, and 73 percent said they were more likely feel satisfied with their organization if it were to invest in their development.

Their level of satisfaction especially depended on how they were treated by their direct manager, even more so than how they were treated by the organization’s top leaders.

Often, Rogers notes, companies will devote resources to developing executives, but the research suggests that they might be better served if they focus on developing managers.

One thought on “What’s Driving Engagement”

  1. While compensation, technology, management training and other ‘tangible’ factors will influence Employee Engagement levels…the greatest source of low engagement (and efficiency) in most organizations lies in poor working relationships.

    People want to feel valued, work in a culture of open dialogue/feedback, harness differences for the better good, resolve conflict, know what motivates each other, etc…

    Those (and more) are key to relationships and relationships are key to engagement.

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