Getting Caught in the Drug Screen

There’s an interesting new story in the New York Times today about how employers are struggling to find a key demographic of the workforce: those who are able to pass a drug test.

From the NYT story:

All over the country, employers say they see a disturbing downside of tighter labor markets as they try to rebuild from the worst recession since the Depression: They are struggling to find workers who can pass a pre-employment drug test.

The hurdle, according to the story, “partly stems from the growing ubiquity of drug testing, at corporations with big human resources departments, in industries like trucking where testing is mandated by federal law for safety reasons, and increasingly at smaller companies.”

Data suggest employers’ difficulties “also reflect an increase in the use of drugs, especially marijuana — employers’ main gripe — and also heroin and other opioid drugs much in the news.”

Indeed, Quest Diagnostics, a national drug-testing service, documented an increase for a second consecutive year in the percentage of Americans who tested positive for illicit drugs — to 4.7 percent in 2014 from 4.3 percent in 2013. And 2013 was the first year in a decade to show an increase, the story notes.

But data on the scope of the problem is “sketchy,” the NYT notes, “because figures on job applicants who test positive for drugs miss the many people who simply skip tests they cannot pass.”

The story gets at an interesting question, but one that doesn’t necessarily get enough attention these days, likely due to all the other debates raging in the workplace: When does drug testing become more onerous than advantageous for an organization?