Internal Investigations are Getting Longer

Patience may be a virtue, but HR leaders shouldn’t expect their employees to necessarily see it that way when it comes to the increasing number of days it’s taking employers to complete internal investigations.

ThinkstockPhotos-470406181As some of you may recall, my colleague — Kristen Frasch — posted details on Friday from NAVEX Global’s 2015 Europe, Middle East, Africa and Asia Pacific State of Compliance Programmes Benchmark Report. In it, NAVEX reported that, on a global scale, boards are not getting regular compliance reports from their ethics and compliance officers.

Well, here’s an even newer report from NAVEX that sheds light on the time it’s taking these days to respond to open internal-investigation cases.

In its 2016 Ethics and Compliance Hotline Benchmark report, NAVEX reveals that the timeline for internal investigations is continuing to lengthen. More precisely, companies took a median of 46 calendar days to close such cases, up from 39 days in 2014 and 32 days in 2011.

HR, diversity and workplace-respect cases, in particular, jumped to 47 calendar days, up from 37 days in 2014. (These cases represented 71 percent of the 867,551 reports — at 2,311 client organizations — in NAVEX’s database.)

Needless to say, this doesn’t bode well for employers that want to keep employee morale high and limit how often employees take their complaints outside their organizations. Who needs the EEOC knocking on your door, right?

Asked what’s driving these longer timelines, Carrie Penman, chief compliance officer and senior vice president of advisory services for NAVEX Global, pointed to several factors.

In a poll conducted during a client webinar held by NAVEX last week, Penman said, roughly 46 percent of the respondents cited a lack of resources as the primary reason. “Resources are simply not keeping pace with the volume,” Penman pointed out. Case complexity turned out to be the second-most-mentioned driver in the poll.

Penman said some of the respondents specifically mentioned the global nature of many of the cases and the more frequent involvement of legal counsels as important drivers. (She said roughly 1,000 individuals participated in the webinar, with about six in 10 taking part in the polling.)

So what should HR leaders be doing about this lengthening time frame?

Penman hopes many will use these findings to hammer home the need for additional resources. As far as her clients are concerned, she said, she advises them to “record all of the issues they are working on in a central database so they can get a holistic picture of what’s going on in their organizations” and can, in turn, make a stronger case for more support.

Among other disturbing findings in the more recent NAVEX report: Workers are apparently skipping an internal remedy and taking retaliation claims outside their organizations. Despite the noticeable rise in retaliation claims being taken up by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in recent years, they continue to represent less than 1 percent of all reports in NAVEX’s database.

“People are simply not giving their organizations a chance to address their concerns and are instead taking them outside … ,” Penman said.