Change Brings Unclear Expectations

When it comes to change in the workplace, employees aren’t as worried about workload as one might think, according to a new  poll from ComPsych Corp.

It finds 31 percent of more than 2,000 surveyed employees are most troubled by unclear expectations from supervisors, while 20 percent are most worried about people issues around change.

“Change has become a constant for many workplaces, whether in the U.S. or globally,” said Dr. Richard A. Chaifetz, Founder, Chairman and CEO of ComPsych. ”Employees are telling us that much of the disequilibrium around change is coming from managers. These challenges have resulted in our training topics of ‘resiliency’ and ‘coping with change’ being by far the most popular,” he added.

When you experience change at work, what is most stressful for you?

31 percent said “unclear expectations from supervisors”

20 percent said “confusion / conflict between coworkers / departments”

18 percent said “belief that workload will increase or become more difficult”

15 percent said “uncertainty about future / questions about stability of company”

13 percent said “new processes / operating rules / skills needed”

3 percent said “other”

It’s interesting to note that employees cite their managers as the primary source of disequilibrium, which makes me think there is an opportunity for HR here to better train managers to be clear with their expectations of their workers.

As for the 20 percent who are most concerned about the
“people issues around change,” it seems that communication efforts could be well-utilized to allay such workers’ concerns about their roles in a changing workplace landscape.

And, while wonky words such as disequilibrium and resiliency may not have been in the workplace lexicon for very long, as the pace of business continues to accelerate, it seems certain that we will be seeing much more of them in the future. I suggest you start building up your resiliency to them now.