NLRB Helping Nonunion Employees Protect Rights

Having followed and posted earlier about the Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille case — namely, the Second Circuit Court of Appeal’s 116040122 -- labor unionupholding of a National Labor Relations Board finding that posting and “liking” a criticism of Triple Play’s income-tax-withholding policies constitutes protected concerted activity —  this more recent post on LinkedIn caught my eye.

Especially its title: Why Union-Free Companies Should Be Very Concerned About This Particular Website … . For the record, here’s the actual site in question, coworker.org.

What also caught my eye was the fact that, according to the post (complete with an analysis by Fast Company worth reading), the NLRB has even dedicated a page on its own website explaining, for nonunion employees, what their rights are under the National Labor Relations Act. As that page states:

“The law we enforce gives employees the right to act together to try to improve their pay and working conditions, with or without a union. If employees are fired, suspended or otherwise penalized for taking part in protected group activity, the [NLRB] will fight to restore what was unlawfully taken away. These rights were written into the original 1935 [NLRA] and have been upheld in numerous decisions by appellate courts and by the U.S. Supreme Court.”

On the NLRB page, recent cases involving a range of industries and employees are highlighted on a map via pins that visitors to the site can hover over for summaries or — by clicking on the pins — full stories about the cases.

Workplacereport.com puts out this warning, that “as coworker.org garners more attention, it continues to grow; and, the more it grows, the more ability it has to do more than merely help nonunion employees with their nonunion issues.” It goes on:

“With coworker.org’s ability to collect data from any employee of any company who logs onto the site, it appears to be a ready-made tool for the co-founders’ former employer, the SEIU (or any other union, for that matter).”

Of course, as the website notes — similar to what many employment lawyers and workplace experts have said over the years — “one of the simplest strategies for any employer of any size to negate the effects coworker.org (or unions) might have on their company would be to identify and try to eliminate workplace issues before employees turn to the outside for change.”

But ask any of them, as well as your fellow HR practitioners, and it becomes apparent that anti-union proactivity is often easier to describe than carry out.

At the very least, Jeff Harrison, a Minneapolis-based Littler shareholder, tells me in this earlier post, “gather your bragging points now; conduct vulnerability assessments,” with special focus on employees being treated fairly, with dignity and respect, and with robust employee-appreciation programs … those catch phrases “you often find in union petitions.”

His parting shot back in that April post is worth repeating here:

“[Bottom line, look closely at your people issues.] Are your people treating your people right? [Because it’s those types of complaints — treatment ones — that] are almost always behind [employees being driven to unionize].”