Making Your Career Site More Accommodating

Earlier this week a press release arrived in my email that served as a reminder of the work that still remains to be done as far as career sites are concerned.

ThinkstockPhotos-464672063In this case, the question at hand is, How accommodating is our career site for candidates who are deaf or have a hearing impairment?

The bottom line: Most organizations’ career sites are severely lacking on this front.

The findings come from a study conducted by CareerXroads and Middlesex County College in New Jersey.

As the press release explains …

“The study, which took place over four months and used the fictional job seeker Jack ‘Jacque’ Coostow to probe some of the world’s most admired companies, found that companies are missing fundamental pieces in ensuring the deaf and hearing impaired have what they need to learn about and apply for jobs.

Middlesex students submitted Coostow’s résumé for positions at the 100 companies on Fortune’s 2014 Best Companies To Work For list. The companies on this list are widely admired for their recruiting and human resources practices. They are considered models for organizations worldwide. Many of them have repeatedly touted their commitments to diversity hiring, including individuals with physical disabilities.”

Among the findings …

  • Three in 10 companies provided a phone number or email address that would allow deaf or hearing-impaired job seekers to access resources for their special communication needs.
  • Roughly one in 10 companies had a TTY line, also called a text telephone or Teletypewriter, that enables deaf and hearing impaired individuals to communicate by phone.
  • One in five companies asked applicants if they had preferences in communication.

You’d think we’d be further along by now than that. No?

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