CDHPs Are Closing the Satisfaction Gap

employee health 1Traditional health insurance plans may still be the most popular option among employees, but consumer-driven plans are beginning to catch on with the workforce.

That seems to be the biggest takeaway from new data coming out of the Employee Benefit Research Institute.

Along with Greenwald & Associates, the Washington-based non-profit research institute recently conducted a survey of nearly 2,000 adults between the ages of 21 and 64, who had health insurance through an employer or purchased health insurance on their own, either directly from a carrier or through a government exchange. According to EBRI’s report on the findings, employees enrolled in traditional health plans are expressing greater satisfaction with their coverage than those in consumer-driven health plans, “but the ‘satisfaction gap’ appears to be narrowing.”

Generally speaking, 61 percent of traditional-plan enrollees described themselves as “extremely” or “very” satisfied with their health plans, compared to 46 percent of those in CDHPs, and 37 percent of employees enrolled in high-deductible health plans.

According to EBRI’s Paul Fronstin, however, overall satisfaction rates have been on the upswing among CDHP enrollees in recent years, while the opposite is true for those participating in traditional health plans.

Cost differences may help explain the emergence of this trend, notes Fronstin, the director of EBRI’s Health Research and Education Program and author of the aforementioned report.

Forty-eight percent of traditional-plan participants said they were “extremely” or “very” satisfied with their out-of-pocket costs when EBRI conducted this same poll in 2014. At that time, 19 percent of high-deductible health plan enrollees said the same, as did 26 percent of CDHP participants. In terms of contentment with what they’re paying out of their own pockets, satisfaction rates for all three groups have been trending upward since 2011, according to EBRI.

In addition, employees in CDHPs or HDHPs were less likely than those in traditional plans to recommend their health plans to friends or co-workers, and were less apt to stay with their current plans if given the option to switch plans—as was the case in past years, according to EBRI.

But, as the survey found on a broader scale, “the percentage of HDHP and CDHP enrollees reporting they would be extremely or very likely to recommend their plan to friends or co-workers has been trending upward,” the report notes, “while it has been flat among individuals with traditional coverage.”