New Year Brings New Reporting Requirements

IND_023Throughout this past year, we’ve told you about some of the steps the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has been taking in its effort to improve workplace safety.

In June, for example, OSHA’s National Fall Safety Stand-Down saw thousands of employers join the organization in taking a timeout during the work day to focus on outlining the dangers of falls and improving fall-prevention efforts.

More recently, OSHA wrote a letter reminding some of the largest U.S. retailers of the potential hazards that accompany Black Friday sales events, and offering recommendations for keeping employees and consumers safe during the post-Thanksgiving shopping frenzy.

The organization’s latest step does more than offer recommendations, and takes effect in a matter of days.

Beginning Jan. 1, 2015, employers under the federal jurisdiction of OSHA will be required to report all work-related fatalities to the organization within eight hours, and must report all inpatient hospitalizations, amputations and losses of an eye within 24 hours of learning of the incident. In the past, employers were obligated to inform OSHA of all workplace fatalities and instances in which three or more workers were hospitalized as a result of the same event.

As Assistant Secretary of Labor and OSHA head David Michaels notes in a recent blog, employers will have three reporting options: calling or visiting their nearest area office during normal business hours, calling the 24-hour OSHA hotline at 800.321.OSHA or reporting online.

OSHA has also made available a handful of resources designed to detail the new requirements and what they mean for employers, including a dedicated web page, a list of FAQs, a fact sheet and a YouTube video.

“It is important to remember that these updated reporting requirements are not simply paperwork, but have a life-saving purpose,” wrote Michaels in the aforementioned blog. “They will help employers and workers prevent future injuries by identifying and eliminating the most serious workplace hazards.”