Workplace Injuries and Illnesses Trend Down

Some positive news coming out of the Bureau of Labor Statistics this morning: Nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses have continued their decline. (The BLS report comes on the heels of a September 163118519report revealing preliminary data that shows a statistically significant decline in fatal work-related injuries. )

According to the BLS, slightly more than 3 million nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses were reported by private-industry employers in 2013, resulting in an incidence rate of 3.3 cases per 100 equivalent full-time workers. This compares to 3.4 cases per 100 equivalent full-time workers in 2012.

Of course, it would be better if these numbers were even lower, but it’s nonetheless encouraging to see them heading in the right direction.

The rate reported by the BLS for 2013 continues a pattern of declines that, with the exception of 2012, occurred annually for the last 11 years.

So where are these decreases occurring? Compared to 2012, the BLS reports lower numbers in manufacturing, retail and utilities. It’s also worth noting that injuries and illnesses among state and local government workers remain significantly higher than the private-industry rates, with 5.2 cases per 100 full-time workers in 2013. For 2012, the BLS reported 5.6 cases per 100 full-time workers.

In case you missed it, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued final rules in September that revised the reporting to OSHA of workplace incidents. Currently, the regulations require employers to report work-related fatalities and in-patient hospitalizations of three or more employees within eight hours of the event. The final rule, which goes into effect Jan. 1, 2015, retains that requirement, but amends the regulation to require employers to report all work-related in-patient hospitalizations, as well as amputations and losses of an eye, to OSHA within 24 hours of the event.

OSHA also modified the list of industries partially exempt from requirements to keep records of work-related injuries and illnesses due to relatively low occupational injury and illness rates.

As might be expected, the new OSHA rule generated some pushback from business groups when it was announced in September.

In a story appearing on The Hill, Joe Trauger, vice president of human resources at the National Association of Manufacturers in Washington, took issue with the reporting of this information online and “called the rule ‘very, very troubling’ and ‘alarming.’  ” He noted that the “information could be taken out of context and used to ‘mischaracterize’ a company.”

Trauger told The Hill

“When OSHA publicizes this information online, it doesn’t provide the full picture of what occurred in the workplace. It could have occurred in the workplace but doesn’t have anything to do with the workplace.”