Bullying Touches All Races and Roles

467291571 -- bullying2A fairly comprehensive — and concerning — report on bullying was released by CareerBuilder on Thursday, showing office bullying knows no partiality when it comes to who the victims are.

The survey of 3,372 U.S. full-time, private-sector employees, conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of Chicago-based CareerBuilder, shows 28 percent of respondents have felt bullied at work and 19 percent of them left their jobs because of it.

More importantly, while the prevalence of bullying is higher among certain minorities and workers with lower incomes, the study finds workers in management roles, those with post-secondary education and other workforce segments are not immune.

“One of the most surprising takeaways from the study was that bullying impacts workers of all backgrounds regardless of race, education, income and level of authority within an organization,” says Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder.

“Many of the workers who have experienced this don’t confront the bully or elect not to report the incidents,” she says, “which can prolong a negative work experience that leads some to leave their jobs.”

Here’s how the percentages of respondents who say they are currently being bullied break down in the study:

Job Level

  • Management (manager, director, team leader, vice president and above) – 27 percent
  • Professional and technical – 21 percent
  • Entry-level/administrative and clerical– 26 percent

Highest Level of Education Attained

  • High-school graduate – 28 percent
  • Associate’s degree – 21 percent
  • Bachelor’s degree or higher – 23 percent

Compensation Level

  • Earning less than $50,000 – 28 percent
  • Earning $50,000 or more – 19 percent

And here’s what I found to be a pretty interesting breakdown as well, the varying ways bullying victims felt bullied on the job:

  • Falsely accused of mistakes he/she didn’t make – 43 percent,
  • Comments were ignored, dismissed or not acknowledged – 41 percent,
  • A different set of standards or policies was used for the worker – 37 percent,
  • Gossip was spread about the worker – 34 percent,
  • Constantly criticized by the boss or co-workers – 32 percent,
  • Belittling comments were made about the person’s work during meetings – 29 percent,
  • Yelled at by the boss in front of co-workers – 27 percent,
  • Purposely excluded from projects or meetings – 20 percent,
  • Credit for his/her work was stolen – 20 percent, and
  • Picked on for personal attributes (race, gender, appearance, etc.) – 20 percent.

And you might find this surprising. I did. Comparing the public and private sectors, workers in government were nearly twice as likely to report being bullied (47 percent) than those in the corporate world (28 percent).

Meanwhile, as David Shadovitz reported back in July, the nation’s road to anti-bullying legislation at the state level — starting with Tennessee — appears to be a slow one, despite the fact that 28 states have introduced such legislation this year.

In fact, as Mark McGraw posted on this blog a little later that month, one of those states — New Hampshire — went in the opposite direction, when its governor — Maggie Hassan — vetoed the bill pending there because its definition of abusive conduct was too broad.

The silver lining there, McGraw says, is that both the governor and the bill’s sponsor acknowledge workplace bullying is a problem that needs to be dealt with.

My guess is the people in that camp far outweigh those questioning the problem’s seriousness. CareerBuilder’s certainly in the former. So what’s it gonna take to get more laws on the books?