Streamlining the Workforce Development System

You can mark July 9 down in your books: Lawmakers from both parties in Washington found something they could agree on!

496666235In case you missed it, Congress passed on Wednesday the Workforce Investment and Opportunity Act, which revamps the nation’s workplace development program. The bill passed in the House by an overwhelming margin, 415 to 6, and is now on its way to President Obama, who is expected to sign it. (It passed in the Senate on June 25 by a 95 to 3 vote.)

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez issued the following statement regarding the passage …

Democrats and Republicans have come together on a bill that is good for workers, employers and the economy as a whole. It will help more people succeed in 21st century jobs and punch their ticket to the middle class. And it will help businesses hire the world-class, highly-skilled workforce required to compete successfully in the global economy.

“WIOA improves the workforce system, aligning it with regional economies and strengthening the network of about 2,500 American Job Centers, to deliver more comprehensive services to workers, job seekers and employers. The bill will build closer ties among key workforce partners—business leaders, workforce boards, labor unions, community colleges and non-profits, and state and local officials—as we strive for a more job-driven approach to training and skills development.”

As we reported in a June 30 story posted on HREOnline.com, the law aims to streamline the workforce development system by:

  •  Eliminating 15 existing programs.
  •  Applying a single set of outcome metrics to every federal workforce program under the Act.
  •  Creating smaller, nimbler and more strategic state and local workforce development boards.
  •  Integrating intake, case management and reporting systems while strengthening evaluations.
  •  Eliminating the “sequence of services” and allowing local areas to better meet the unique needs of individuals.

The legislation—a compromise between the SKILLS Act (which passed in the House last year) and the Workforce Investment Act of 2013—was endorsed by the Chamber of Commerce, which cited as positives the bill’s focus on “the continued leadership role of business, the clear language that promotes alignment of investments in education and training, and the increasing focus on outcomes.”

Of course, now the hard part begins. As James J. Parks, an attorney with Jaffe Raitt Heuer & Weiss, noted in our June 30 piece, “The problem you always have when you change anything in the government is the bureaucracy. Bureaucracy is a self-sustaining animal.”

But that said, there’s no denying that any effort to streamline the nation’s workforce programs and remove some of the much-dreaded inherent red tape should be viewed by the HR community as a good thing.

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