Chamber Renders a Scathing EEOC Assessment

85449254 -- gavel and flagI have Michael J. Lotito’s LinkedIn group, Littler’s Workplace Policy Institute, to thank for cluing me in to this latest blast against the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission — a report from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce that is so weighty with criticism, it comes in two parts: one, an examination of what it calls the agency’s “unreasonable enforcement efforts,” and two, a detailed review of its “unsuccessful 2013 amicus program, in which its legal interpretations were rejected by federal courts approximately 80 percent of the time.”

The conclusions of each part give a clear sense of just how scathing this assessment of the EEOC is. Here’s part one’s:

Combating discrimination in the workplace is a worthy goal and one that the Chamber supports. However … EEOC’s abusive enforcement tactics can no longer be ignored. While some federal judges are pushing back in some cases, EEOC clearly has not received the message. Moreover, relying on judges as the final check on EEOC enforcement is often a case of ‘too little, too late': by that time, employers have already spent significant time and resources defending themselves against unmeritorious allegations. In other words, even when employers win, they lose. The time has come for EEOC to adopt institutional procedures to provide for internal accountability, more efficient use of resources and adherence to its own statutory conciliation requirement. If EEOC continues to ignore the problem, then Congress should use its oversight authority to install much needed safeguards within EEOC.”

And here’s part two’s:

Whether EEOC’s 2013 amicus program’s success is measured on a pure numerical won/los[t] basis, or on the importance of the substantive interpretations of federal law it supported in its amicus efforts, one thing is clear: It was an overwhelming failure. What’s more, the courts’ rejection of EEOC’s underlying regulatory guidance leaves employers searching as to where to find accurate, reliable guidance on their legal obligations under federal non-discrimination laws. And, with a fully staffed Commission, several new guidance positions are possible on a broad range of topics including: wellness plans, reasonable accommodations, pregnancy and national-origin discrimination, and credit-related background checks. Of course, whether any future guidance would fare better than EEOC’s 2013 track record is unknown. However, if the best predictor of future performance is past performance, in light of EEOC’s 2013 amicus performance, it is unlikely.”

I contacted Christine Nazer, public spokesperson for the EEOC, to get her agency’s reaction to this hefty slap. Here’s what she had to say: “The EEOC’s litigation program is a critical part of the success of our mission to stop and remedy unlawful employment discrimination. By any measure, the EEOC has achieved a remarkable record at trial in recent years: We prevailed in nine out of 10 jury trials in 2013.  The agency also takes the concerns raised by members of Congress seriously, and will continue to work with them to ensure the nation’s workplaces are safe and free of discrimination.”

Still, as we report in our July-August HRE cover story, “Get Ready to Rumble,” which went live earlier today, and in last year’s June 16 cover story, “Watch Your Step!” the EEOC does, indeed, need to be reckoned with by employers and their HR departments because of its stepped-up enforcement tactics. And when it does come knocking, and it will, you and your counsel better be prepared with well-documented answers and proof of compliance.

Mind you, as the Chamber points out, and as many news stories and blog posts by us corroborate, including this one of mine on April 17, the agency hasn’t exactly been without its missteps in trying to carry that enhanced enforcement out.

But EEOC missteps haven’t stopped the agency from marching in and clamping down. At least, not yet.

As Merrily Archer — a Denver-based attorney, head of EEO Legal Solutions and a former staff attorney with the EEOC — put it in a recent blog post quoted by writer Will Bunch in “Get Ready to Rumble,” EEOC lawyers and human resource executives should ideally be acknowledging their shared goals in reducing discrimination — “but that level of peace and understanding is not likely anytime soon.”

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