Listening to the Data

I was having lunch the other day across the street from a noisy construction site. It wasn’t the best location in the world to read a book and enjoy a sandwich, but it was one of the few places I could find with some comfortable shade.

122399493As I sat there consuming my sandwich (and drink), I remember thinking to myself, “How in the world do these folks work eight hours straight with all that banging and clanging? I’m sure they were wearing protective gear to diffuse some of that noise, but despite the protection, it still had to be loud enough to drive a sane person crazy. (I eventually moved.)

If you’re like me, you probably know a few folks who’ve lost a decent amount of hearing as a result of the work they do. Some recognize they have a problem and have taken steps to remedy it, say by acquiring a hearing aid. Others are less aware, perhaps in denial or simply reluctant to do something about it. (According to the National Center on Hearing Assessment, only one in four people with hearing loss use hearing aids.)

When we think of the health and well-being of employees, a host of issues comes to mind. Diet. Exercise. Regular checkups. Hearing loss? Not really. But as a Better Hearing Institute press release sent out the other day to raise awareness on this issue points out, the problem of hearing loss is widespread, affecting more than 40 million Americans. And costly.

In an effort to bring attention to the issue, the American Tinnitus Association recently sent out its own press release, encouraging both employers and employees to be proactive. It urged employers to develop engineering controls to reduce overall noise output and implement administrative procedures to minimize workers’ noise exposure. Meanwhile, it asked workers to take control of their hearing health by using appropriate ear and noise protectors.

Of course, before either of these things are going to happen, employers and employees alike are going to have to get on the same page and acknowledge that a noise problem exists. Soon-to-be-released research suggests there’s a definite disconnect here between the perceptions of the two.

According to a survey of 1,500 full-time workers and nearly 500 benefits professionals by EPIC Hearing Healthcare ( a hearing-care provider), employees and employers each have a somewhat different take on the situation. Asked how many hours a day they believe their workplace is noisy, more than half (55 percent) of the employee respondents said it is noisy for more than one hour a day and more than one-third (36 percent) said it was noisy for more than three hours a day. In contrast, nearly 80 percent of employers said their workplace is hardly ever noisy.

The EPIC research also found nearly half of the employees felt the level of noise at work was damaging their hearing, even though less than one in four have had their hearing checked in the past two years.

In light of the above data and the impact hearing loss can have on productivity, employers shouldn’t be turning a deaf ear to this issue (excuse the pun). Indeed, they certainly have no shortage of tools available to them, ranging from reducing noise levels in their workplaces and providing employees with better protection to offering “financial support” through insurance products (EPIC’s business) and raising employee awareness.

Being this month is National Employee Wellness Month, I would think it might be as good a time as any for employers to revisit the state of their respective workplaces as far as noise exposure is concerned and the efforts that they’re taking to address the problem.

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