Broadening Definitions Under the ADA

In case you missed it, employers were recently given further insight as to what qualifies these days as a disability under the ADA Amendments Act of 2008.

On Jan. 23, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that, as long as a temporary impairment is sufficiently severe, it would qualify as a disability, reversing a district court decision regarding a wrongful-discharge claim.

200249331-001The case involved Carl Summers, who, as a senior analyst for Altarum Institute, fell and injured himself while exiting a commuter train. Summers, who underwent leg surgery and was told by doctors he might not be able to walk normally for at least seven months, was provided with short-term-disability benefits. He suggested that he start working part-time from home and gradually return to full-time work, but representatives from Altarum failed to follow up on Summer’s return-to-work plan or suggest any alternative reasonable accommodation. The firm eventually terminated him, installing another analyst in his position.

In Sept. 2012, Summers filed a complaint under the ADA, alleging he was wrongfully terminated because of his disability.

In its ruling, the Fourth Circuit said “an impairment is not categorically excluded from being a disability simply because it is temporary” and that Summer’s alleged impairment “falls under the amended Act’s expanded definition of disability.”

I asked Paul Mollica, of council with Outten & Golden LLP in Chicago, for his thoughts on what the decision—which many believe could be the first ruling of its kind under the ADAAA—means for employers.

Going forward, he told me, employers are going to need to accept that the “lessons learned up to this point aren’t true anymore” and “retool” accordingly.

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