Fast-Food Workers Strike Again

Even on a normal day, you’re not likely to find me frequenting a fast-food restaurant. But yesterday seemed like a particularly good day to stay away.

By now, you’ve no doubt heard that workers at fast-food restaurants such as McDonald’s, KFC and Burger King in nearly 60 cities (ranging from Atlanta and Kansas City to Springfield, Ill., and San Lorenzo, Calif.) walked out of their establishments in protest over low pay. The workers are seeking a boost in their hourly wages to $15 an hour. (According to the Service Employees International Union, the average pay of these workers is around $8.94 an hour—though many earn the federal minimum wage of $7.25.)

148115569Though similar walkouts by fast-food workers occurred over the past year, this is reportedly the largest. (In case you’re wondering, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports there were 19 major strikes and lockouts involving 1,000 or more workers lasting at least one shift in 2012, unchanged from 2011.)

USA Today reports that, in Detroit, a dozen workers didn’t show up for their shift at a McDonald’s on 8 Mile Road, forcing the closure of the dining room there, while another protest took place at a McDonald’s on West Grand Boulevard. About 30 workers in Raleigh, N.C., meanwhile, picketed outside a Little Caesars.

In New York and Chicago, Bloomberg reports, “passersby demonstrated little support for the workers and there were comments about $15 an hour being too high for entry-level jobs. Moments after protesters left a Wendy’s in downtown Manhattan, about 20 people piled into the store for lunch. When chanting strikers entered the Chicago McDonald’s, workers continued to pour coffee and bag food for a throng of customers.”

If one of the strikers’ goals is to have their voices heard, they definitely succeeded. Pretty much every mainstream news outlet in the universe picked up on the story. Still, few expect these workers are going to see $15 an hour wages anytime soon. “This is a more widespread [action] and involves more cities,” says Sonya Madison, an attorney with Counsel on Call based in Atlanta. “But I do think the results may be similar to before, in that you’re dealing with franchises, which aren’t making millions of dollars. It’s going to be difficult for them to raise wages.”

If there’s a change, Madison adds, “it’s going to occur on the legislative level.”

As most of you know, President Obama pushed to raise the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour (the last time the minimum wage was increased was in 2009). But with stiff resistance in Congress, that probably won’t happen anytime soon as well.

Happy Labor Day, BTW.

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