Do As We Say, Not as We Do …

There’s just one question that comes to my mind while reading over the alleged misdeeds of former Best Buy Chairman and Founder Richard M. Schulze: Just what was this guy thinking?!?

By this point the general outline of the story is fairly well-known: Schulze has just resigned after acknowledging he knew about an “improper relationship” between Best Buy’s (married) CEO and a younger female employee, yet failed to report it to the board of directors. CEO Brian Dunn, who resigned last month, “violated company policy by engaging in an extremely close personal relationship with a female employee that negatively impacted the work environment,” according to a report by the board’s audit committee, which began looking into the matter in March after a Best Buy HR exec heard about it, according to the New York Times.

The 51-year old Dunn and the 29-year-old employee appeared to have had a rather intense relationship, even if–as they maintain–it was not sexual. According to the audit report, the CEO contacted the female employee by cellphone “at least 224 times during one four-day and one five-day trip abroad, including at least 33 phone calls, 149 text messages and 42 pictures or video messages.” Things got especially awkward in the workplace when the employee began boasting to other employees about her relationship with Dunn and the favors he provided her with, including tickets to concerts and sports events.

For me, the kicker is when an executive provided Schulze with a signed, written statement from another employee detailing the relationship between Dunn and the young woman. Chairman Schulze proceeded to confront Dunn with the written allegation and ask if it was true. Dunn denied it was true, and Schulze dropped the matter, failing to follow company policy by notifying the appropriate company officials. Let me state that again: Schulze confronted Dunn with a SIGNED, WRITTEN STATEMENT from a whistleblowing employee, and then did nothing. So, Best Buy, how’s that whistleblower program working out? How’re the corporate ethics folks feeling these days? And how’s that whistleblowing employee doing–does he or she still have a job at Best Buy?

After flagrantly violating company policy, Dunn is walking away with an estimated $6.6 million severance package. Schulze will receive the “honorary title of chairman emeritus” when his resignation is official in June.

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