Two More Years? Or Six More?

On the same day President Obama began his re-election campaign, Shawn McBurney, senior vice president of govermental affairs at the American Hotel and Lodging Association, spoke of the way the hospitality industry was being targeted by his administration.

“For those of you who feel persecuted, you should,” he said, noting that the Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration and National Labor Relations Board, to name just a few, are looking hard to find violations of workers’ rights.

The DOL, he said, believes the hospitality industry “is evil and they are targeting the industry.”

The comments were part of a session on public policy and HR strategy at the 5th Annual HR in Hospitality® Conference, which drew more than 275 attendees to the Marriott Wardman Park in Washington. The event runs April 4 to 6.

And even when there is not ill intent, off-the-cuff comments by politicians can be harmful, said Geoff Freeman, executive vice president of public affairs and strategy development at the U.S. Travel Association. He mentioned Obama’s infamous-in-the-industry remarks about discouraging travelers from going to Las Vegas, Vice President Joe Biden’s remarks about not traveling by air when fears of swine flu were rampant, and a U.S. General Services Administration notice to the effect that any trips not taken are good for the environment.

That last statement, Freeman said, was made without any study being done or being grounded in any data. In fact, he said, the truth might be just the opposite: Employees who are on business trips or at conferences may use less energy because they are grounded in one spot and are not driving to work or taking subways every day.

Regardless of whether Obama wins re-election or not, however, the deficit may drive whoever is in power to reconsider the ability of companies to write off healthcare and retirement costs, said Mike Aitken, director of governmental affairs at the Society for Human Resource Management. Those two tax write-offs offer the most potential revenue to the government, ranking even above the home-mortgage deduction.

Companies should also be wary, Aitken said, of actions emanating from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which has been examining “barriers to employment,” including age, credit reports, criminal-background checks and even unemployment. Credit and criminal checks, he said, are areas the EEOC is “particularly interested in.”

Immigration is another area where the government believes ”we are the bad guys,” Aitken said. The Department of Homeland Security collected $1 million in fines in 2009 from-employer violations. In 2010, he said, the total fines collected were $7 million. And DHS is continuing to increase its enforcement efforts.

1 Comment

  1. jaycasey says:

    Let’s be honest here. We all know that the hospitality industry has a problem in regard to following labor regulations. Most businesses follow the law but enough don’t that it gives the industry a bad image. As much as we don’t like regulations when they are applied to us we are all in favor of regulations when they protect us. We want our airplanes inspected, our IPR protected, and our drinking water monitored – right? Well, we also need employee rights protected and we can’t police ourselves can we? So give the Administration a break – they are doing their job.