The Great HCM Debate, Part 2

Workforce planning and analytics: What do they really mean, and what does a workforce planning strategy look like? HR Technology® Conference co-chair Bill Kutik asked the two participants in The Great Technology Debate, Gartner managing vice president Jim Holincheck and Knowledge Infusion CEO Jason Averbook, to give their thoughts on the topic.

“Analytics are great if you have a great data structure in place,” said Averbook. “It also helps if analytics are really ‘in your face’–Amazon, for example, has a great metric: ‘People who bought this book also bought this book.’ That’s an analytic that creates some action–‘Hey, maybe I should check out this other book.’ When you create analytics that are actionable, that’s when this space will take off.”

A metric that alerts a business executive that sales are down in a particular region because of a shortage of trained salespeople is a good example of an “actionable analytic,” said Averbook.

Workforce planning technnology that lets companies predict labor trends and costs, and adjust their training and recruiting programs accordingly, is still in its first generation, he said. “That’s why this space is so exciting–we’re moving toward that predictability model.”

When asked about social media, Holincheck admitted he is “something of a curmudgeon” on the topic–particularly with respect to what he said is the trend of “everyone trying to embed social media everywhere–it just doesn’t make sense.”

“Some HR departments are very progressive about social media in the workplace but for many others, that’s not the case,” he said. “And, employees are already using Facebook and Twitter–why would they abandon those in favor of enterprise versions you’ve installed?”

Above all, said Holincheck, HR should not attempt to implement a social-media strategy without closely consulting with other departments within the organization. “Other departments are using social media–work with them, have a companywide strategy–otherwise, HR is going to be viewed as just trying to do their own thing, and the effort will fall flat.”

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